In The Morning News

Washington Post: Economy Remains Key Issue In Democratic Presidential Race
“Hillary Clinton “launched a tough new offensive against Sen. Barack Obama on Wednesday, asserting flatly that her rival for the Democratic presidential nomination is not prepared to serve as commander in chief.” The Post suggests she launched the new attacks because, “Exit polls in Wisconsin suggested that Clinton’s economic message — a populist-tinged pledge to restore the policies of the 1990s boom — may be falling flat. Obama held a big advantage over her among Wisconsin voters who rated the economy as their top concern. He edged her out among those naming health care, her signature issue, as the country’s single biggest problem.”
Associated Press: Government Plan Does Little to Help “Jumbo” Loans
“The piece of the government’s economic stimulus plan aimed at bolstering the housing market may not work out as planned.” While Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac “can now purchase and guarantee home loans of up to $729,750, they won’t be traded in a key secondary market, limiting the prospect for sharply lower rates on ‘jumbo’ mortgages.” Therefore, the interest rates on these loans “will need to be higher to attract investors. And that’s less-than-ideal for consumers looking to take out or refinance jumbo home loans.”
Associated Press: States Looking To Expand Age Mandates For Health Plans
“Almost all states, when regulating insurance plans for small- and medium-sized employers, set a maximum age for coverage of dependent children,” but now states are “looking at this group of young people as they seek to reduce the number of uninsured.” An organization of “lawmakers who specialize in insurance regulation, the National Conference of Insurance Legislators, will vote on a policy recommendation in two weeks that supports increasing the availability of dependent benefits up to age 25. The endorsement would be important because legislators around the country look to the organization for guidance on insurance issues.”