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In The Morning News

Posted on 03/27/2008 by |Archived Contributor | Comments

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Forbes: Businesses Find Ways To Address Health Care Concerns
“What is the solution for…runaway” health care “costs? Barack Obama and Hillary Clinton propose universal coverage — effectively nationalization. Clinton further wants mandatory U.S. citizen enrollment under penalty of law, an idea that practically begs us to see Hillary as the hated Nurse Ratched.” Yet, “John McCain and most Republicans say little about health care costs. And they are right, to a point. Nothing would be preferable to Hillary Care.” Karlgaard writes he spoke recently with Clayton Christensen, professor at Harvard Business School, who said that “American businesses are already solving the problem,” by hiring “staff doctors whose main role is to use advanced technology to diagnose employee ills,” and then send them to “to the right specialty clinic or hospital–a heart hospital or hernia hospital.”
AP: Treasury Secretary Suggests More Regulation For Wall Street
“If big Wall Street investment houses are allowed to run to the Federal Reserve for emergency lending, they must face stepped-up regulation, Treasury Secretary Henry Paulson declared Wednesday. The demise of once-mighty Bear Stearns proves ‘the world has changed,’ underscoring a need for the government to adapt, too, he said.” Paulson, in a speech to the US Chamber of Commerce, said the Administration “will soon put forth an oversight blueprint in an effort to promote smoother functioning of financial markets.”
US News and World Report: Tips On Avoiding Retirement Mistakes
“A few bad moves can cost you dearly” in retirement. US News cites six “common missteps,” including neglecting to create a “comprehensive plan that includes asset allocation and estate planning,” and “underestimating life expectancy” and “rising healthcare costs.” US News writes, “A 65-year-old couple retiring this year will need about $225,000 just to cover medical costs in retirement, according to Fidelity Investments,” and that amount represents a “whopping 41 percent jump from 2002.”