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"Empty Nest" can just mean a "New Nest"

Posted on 04/20/2010 by |Archived Contributor | Comments

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Everyone knows about “empty nest syndrome.” People warn those whose children quickly grow up and head out on their own that there will be a feeling of loneliness around the nest – and that may very well be true for some, but this great article in the Chicago Tribune takes a different look at the empty nest – and I like this point of view!
The article profiles a couple who took the opportunity to redesign their home when their youngest child became an adult and moved out. They took their old farmhouse and, with the help of many architects and designers and friends, turned it into the adult space they could really get use out of for years to come. They modernized the design of the rooms, and took advantage of newfound space that was once “reserved for homework” can now be a grown up hobby space.
The article also takes a look at the very real possibility that your home may become a multi-generational home, especially since this decade has seen a nearly 25 percent increase in multigenerational homes. Homes need to be versatile to accommodate “boomerang children” and/or aging parents – and boomers who want to age in place. Specifically, the article points out that if you’re remodeling, a first floor master suite could come in handy down the road.
Check out the article – it was a good read this morning. Share with us any home modifications you’ve been doing since your kids have grown up!

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