AARP Home » AARP Blog » AARP »Work »Job Hunting: How Do You Stand Out if You’re Over 50, Unemployed, or Both?
Work Print Print

If you’re wondering about this, you’re definitely in good company.

How can you make your resume stand out in the sea of other applications? And if you’re lucky enough to make it to a ‘phone screen’ with HR – or an actual interview – how can you set yourself apart from the crowd and make a lasting impression so you can get to the next round?

A free webinar called How to Stand Out in a Crowded Job Market, being offered on Thursday, December 1 at 2 p.m. ET, has been designed by AARP to help you do that.

Just as products we all use daily have brand identities, job search experts say that you need to present yourself as a “product” to prospective employers. You’re selling yourself, and your goal is to stand out from applicants with similar qualifications and experiences.

Multiple applicants can clearly do the job, but how do you convince a prospective employer that you’re the best fit? Speaking of questions, “Will I ever work again?” is a common thought for unemployed people over 50. Employers may wonder about your ability to adapt to change, especially if you were with one employer for more than a decade. “How to Stand Out” should help you be able to better position yourself as a solid contributor ready to hit the ground running in a 21st-century work environment – even if the last time you looked for a job was in the 1990s (or earlier).

One mantra for job-seekers: leave no stone unturned. Take advantage of every opportunity you can to polish yourself as a candidate. Also keep in mind that seasonal work for the holidays could turn into something long-term, and can help you expand the number of people you know who might be able to open a door.

Look for a blog post with highlights from “How to Stand Out” on December 2. Meanwhile, here are some resources designed for people 50 and over to help with your job search. If you’re between jobs, AARP will even offer you a free one-year membership to people 50+ and unemployed.

And if you have a job this Thanksgiving season – even if it’s not the job of your dreams – remember to count your blessings. Millions of people would love to trade places with you in this economy.

Photo via Artiii’s photostream in Flickr Creative Commons.