Moving Dementia Caregiver Support Services into the Mainstream

Many of you, like me, know that family caregiving for someone you love can be a source of deep satisfaction and meaning.  But caring for a person with dementia, known as dementia caregivers, can exact an especially high emotional, physical and financial toll on family members themselves.

Dementia caregivers commonly experience more emotional upset, distress, isolation, and financial burdens than those caring for people with other illnesses who do not have dementia because daily care needs are progressive, complex, and frequently unpredictable.

More people are living at home with dementia and relying on their family to care for them

Addressing the needs of dementia caregivers is important because of the growing number of older people living at home with dementia who rely primarily on their families for help with basic tasks of daily living.  According to a report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the proportion of people with dementia dying at home increased significantly between 1999 and 2014, from 13.9 percent in 1999 to 24.9 percent in 2014, underscoring the increasing numbers of people with dementia residing outside of a nursing home setting.  This means that more people than ever are caring at home for someone living with dementia often without adequate and affordable support services, exacerbating the stresses all the more.

Part of that stress is the cost to families.

A recent study on the lifetime cost of dementia shows that families incur 70 percent of the total cost of care ($225,140 in 2015 dollars) for a person living with dementia. Medicare ($52,540) and Medicaid ($44,090) accounted for 30 percent of the total cost.

Taking care of dementia caregivers

Targeted care strategies, such as education, skills training, and counseling, can make a real difference in the daily lives of people with dementia and their family caregivers.  It is especially important, for example, to have someone to talk to when help is needed to address the behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia. Successful programs for dementia caregivers begin with the health or social service provider talking with the family caregiver about his or her unique needs, problems, strengths, and resources, in what is known as a caregiver assessment.

Although evidence-based programs hold promise to create more value in the lives of dementia caregivers, these proven services are still not commonplace in communities and available to the families who could benefit from them.

A new AARP Public Policy Institute paper highlights examples of successful dementia caregiver programs and services. The report also identifies several barriers to scaling up evidence-based programs, including health care and social service providers’ lack of knowledge about successful caregiver services, and limited technical assistance to help providers understand how to identify family caregivers who might benefit from such programs and services.  Barriers also include a lack of integration of caregiver supports in existing systems of health care and long-term services and supports, and a lack of sufficient funding and payment mechanisms to adopt proven caregiver support services in practice settings.

The forthcoming National Research Summit on Dementia Care aims to shine a light on the need to accelerate the scaling up of evidence-based services for individuals living with dementia and their family caregivers.  Advancing these programs to reach families who need them should be a priority at the federal, state and local levels.

 

Lynn Friss Feinberg is a senior strategic policy adviser for the AARP Public Policy Institute.  She has conducted policy analysis and applied research on family caregiving and long-term services and supports for more than 30 years.

 

 

 

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