Allan Roth is the founder of Wealth Logic, an hourly-based financial planning firm in Colorado Springs, Colo. He has taught investing and finance at universities and written for Money Magazine, The Wall Street Journal and others. His contributions aren't meant to convey specific investment advice.

Financial Adviser Exposes Own Portfolio

People are often surprised when I describe my personal portfolio to them. Using an analyzing tool from Chicago-based Morningstar, I’ve put together a brief description of my own daringly dull portfolio and, far more important, why it looks like it does. Most of my investments are in mutual funds with an average expense ratio of 0.16 percent annually. I don’t have enough money to diversify by buying individual stocks, so I buy low-cost index funds that track the overall market. …

3 Reasons to Consider a ‘Robo-Adviser’

I’m a fan of the so-called “robo-advisers.” These are online wealth management services that provide automated software-based portfolio management advice without the use of human advisers. Two of the larger robo-advisers are Betterment and Wealthfront. In addition, Schwab recently launched its version, branded Intelligent Portfolios, and Vanguard has a product called Personal Advisor Services. Here are three reasons I’m a fan of these adviser services: Lower fees Fees matter. And because they do, I encourage people to get real when …

Does Economic News Drive the Stock Market?

Twice last week, the Dow Jones industrial average suffered triple-digit losses. Friday’s loss of 115 points was pinned on economic worries as GDP declined. The previous Tuesday, the Dow lost 190 points, which the media blamed on Fed rate hike fears. The broader Standard & Poor’s 500 index also had bad days. Every day, experts are on hand to explain why the stock market did what it did that day. But is there any validity behind these seemingly logical explanations, …

Can Indexing Become Too Big?

For some time now, actively managed mutual funds have been underperforming index funds that essentially own shares of all the stocks in the market. That’s because the lower costs of index funds give them huge advantages over the high-priced active funds. Though I’ve been investing in index funds for decades, I’m rather surprised by their more recent popularity. My indexing approach was once rare, but now a full 37 percent of the money in U.S. stock funds is in index …

Why You Need to Check Your Credit Report

Revised July 22, 2015. Some 44 percent of people age 65 and up have never checked any of their credit reports, according to a recent survey by Bankrate.com. That percentage shocks me, especially considering how important the information is and how easy it is now to get it for free. Here’s why you need it and how to get it. It’s important “Monitoring your credit goes well beyond scanning a three-digit [credit score] number,” said Jeanine Skowronski, credit card analyst …

Stock Investing: Time Versus Timing

More and more investors are telling me that their portfolios have now fully recovered from the 2008 stock market crash. I respond in my typical tactless way by telling them their performance has been awful. That’s because stocks are now 64 percent above their pre-crash high. Put another way, if you had timed the market perfectly wrong and put $10,000 in a total stock market index fund on Oct. 9, 2007, the pre-crash peak, you’d have about $16,375 today. All …