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Sally Abrahms

Biography:

Sally Abrahms is a long-time contributor to AARP with both a personal and professional interest in caregiving. For the last 12 years, she cared for her father, then her mother and now her mother-in-law. She covers aging and boomers and has written for TIME, Newsweek, the New York Times, USA Today and the Huffington Post.

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Sally Abrahms'sPosts

New Study Looks at Caregiving and Twins

Posted on 02/4/2014 by |Caregiving | Comments

Bulletin Today | CaregivingDoes caregiving cause stress? Most research shows that it does — in spades.  But a small study on a limited sample suggests how family caregivers handle distress is influenced more by their genes and family history than by the difficulty of the caregiving role. Those are the findings of Peter Vitaliano, a professor of psychiatry and psychology at the University of Washington, and his colleagues after studying more than a thousand female twins, some of whom were caregivers. According to Vitaliano, how your parents …

Report Shows Americans Don’t Worry About Aging Population

Posted on 01/30/2014 by |Caregiving | Comments

Bulletin Today | Caregiving“What? Me worry?” Those famous words of Mad Magazine’s fictitious Alfred E. Neuman seem to sum up the attitude Americans have about whether aging is a problem in this country. A just-released Pew Research Center global aging report asked residents of 21 countries if they thought the burgeoning number of older people was a “major problem” for their country and for themselves. In fact, the United States ranked No. 19, or two places from the lowest. Japanese and South Koreans, who …

New Government Website Tackles Long-Term Care Infection

Posted on 01/30/2014 by |Caregiving | Comments

CaregivingYou’ve heard it before. You go into the hospital for one thing and come out with another: a whopping infection contracted there. Did you know that you’re also at risk for infection in assisted living and nursing homes? The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has just launched a website to help put the brakes on infection in long-term care settings. The numbers are big. Every year, the CDC estimates that 1 million to 3 million long-term care residents contract …

Medicare Clarifies Rehab Coverage

Posted on 01/23/2014 by |Caregiving | Comments

Bulletin Today | CaregivingYou know how frustrating—no, make that infuriating—it can be to try to get reimbursed by Medicare for some rehabilitation services? You’re sure the rehab is helpful, but you can’t convince The Powers That Be. Why? It used to be that Medicare would pay only if the patient were improving.  Now, there’s been a healthy change in policy: You’ll be able to continue receiving physical therapy, occupational therapy and speech-language pathology services to prevent further deterioration (a.k.a. slow the decline) or …

Affordable Housing for LGBT Older Adults on the Rise

Posted on 01/14/2014 by |Caregiving | Comments

CaregivingUntil recently, if you were older, gay, and low-income, finding housing would have proven elusive. That is beginning to change. This month, a six-story affordable housing apartment building for gay, lesbian and transgendered adults over age 62 has opened in downtown Philadelphia. It offers heath services and events under its roof to residents who live in the 56 one-bedroom units. The John C. Anderson Apartments, as it is known, is part of a growing trend of similar LGBT senior housing …

Reducing the Stigma of Dementia Through Song

Posted on 01/6/2014 by |Caregiving | Comments

CaregivingHaving college students and older adults with Alzheimer’s sing together can change younger choir members’ perceptions of dementia and reduce social isolation in those with the disease and their family caregivers. These are the findings of a pilot study conducted last spring at the John Carroll University in Ohio. (The study will be published this April in the American Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease and Other Dementias.) The dementia study is part of a worldwide effort to try to normalize the …