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Legacy

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Recent LegacyPosts

Chuck Stone: The Columnist Who Saved Lives

Posted on 04/7/2014 by |Who's News | Comments

Bulletin Today | LegacyBack when Chuck Stone was a columnist for the Philadelphia Daily News (from 1972 to 1991), it wouldn’t have been advertising hype to say that he was the most trusted man in the City of Brotherly Love. People put their faith in Stone, who died on April 6 at age 89 in Farmington, N.C. It wasn’t just his street-smart knowledge of the city and the elegant old-school prose decorated with 0bscure words. They believed in his essential goodness, in the …

The Man Who Dreamed Up ‘The Impossible Dream’

Posted on 03/19/2014 by |Who's News | Comments

LegacyBeing a one-hit wonder might be enough if your single stroke of genius turns out to be one of the most enduring, oft-recorded songs in the history of popular music — “The Impossible Dream (The Quest)” from the 1965 Broadway musical Man of La Mancha. Composer Mitch Leigh, who died on March 16 at age 86 in New York City, was a Yale-educated advertising-jingle writer with a couple of short-lived theatrical productions to his credit when, in an unlikely twist of …

David Brenner: He Made Everyday Life Seem Funny

Posted on 03/17/2014 by |Who's News | Comments

LegacyAs a stand-up comic, David Brenner’s trademark line was “Did you ever notice … ?” Brenner, who died on March 15 at age 78 in New York City, made his living calling the myriad absurdities of everyday life to our attention — “the dumb things we say and do,” he once put it. Brenner, in fact, could get an entire routine out of, say, the frustrations that drivers experience when they have to ask for directions. Here he is, doing that …

Joe McGinniss: The Journalist As ‘Psychological Detective’

Posted on 03/11/2014 by |Who's News | Comments

LegacySome writers are myth-makers. Joe McGinniss, who died on March 10 at age 71 in Worchester, Mass., was the opposite. Whether McGinniss was writing about the repackaging of Richard Nixon in The Selling of the President 1968 or Dr. Jeffrey MacDonald in the 1983 book Fatal Vision, McGinness liked to get up close and personal with a subject, gradually peel away a carefully crafted public persona like the leaves of an artichoke. In doing so, he usually became part of the story …

Jim Lange: Host of ‘The Dating Game’

Posted on 02/27/2014 by |Who's News | Comments

LegacyA newspaper feature writer gushed in 1969 that Jim Lange, the host of The Dating Game, personified “the swinging, nattily dressed bachelor.” The description might seem amusingly quaint today, but then again, so would the show itself. During its original run from 1965 to 1973, The Dating Game — in which a “bachelorette” picked one of three prospective bachelors hidden behind a screen, or vice-versa, by asking provocative questions — was an awkward artifact of society’s evolving attitudes about sexual freedom …

Harold Ramis: A Funnyman’s Finest Moments

Posted on 02/25/2014 by |Who's News | Comments

LegacyFor many of us, Harold Ramis will always be Dr. Egon Spengler, the wild-haired, intensely serious paranormal researcher in the 1984 comedy classic Ghostbusters. With his bizarre, faux-scientific mumbo-jumbo, it was Ramis’ character who provided the perfect foil for the irreverent, semi-competent Dr. Peter Venkman (Bill Murray) and anxiously earnest Dr. Raymond Stantz (Dan Aykroyd). But most moviegoers probably didn’t realize that Ramis, who died  on Feb. 24 at age 69 in his native Chicago, had co-written the Ghostbusters screenplay with …