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Legacy

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Recent LegacyPosts

Jerry Vale: A Voice Like Velvet

Posted on 05/19/2014 by |Who's News | Comments

Bulletin Today | LegacyEven in his heyday in the 1950s and 1960s, Jerry Vale was never hip or trendy. Instead of jazz or rock, he stuck to ballads and love songs — the sort that would prompt a guy’s date to rest her head against his shoulder, whether they were out for a drive in the Rambler or having a slow dance in one of the smoky nightclubs where Vale got his start. But it worked, because Vale, who died on May 18 …

Lynn Williams: He Fought for Retired Steelworkers

Posted on 05/13/2014 by |Who's News | Comments

LegacyWhen Lynn Williams took the helm of the United Steelworkers union in 1983, the domestic steel industry seemed to be in a death spiral. From 1981 to 1985 — a period Williams later called a “frightful time” for the union, its members and its retirees — the basic steel industry shed some 350,000 jobs in the United States, triggering a wave of early retirements and, in many cases, putting retiree health benefits and pensions in jeopardy. >> Sign up for …

Oh-So-Cool Actor Efrem Zimbalist Jr. Dies

Posted on 05/5/2014 by |Who's News | Comments

Bulletin Today | LegacyBack in late 1950s and early 1960s, one of the coolest series on the tube was 77 Sunset Strip, a stylish variation on hard-boiled detective noir infused with wise-cracking hipster humor — sort of Raymond Chandler meets the Rat Pack, set in what TV historian Horace Newcomb describes as “a sun-drenched world of cocktails, cool jazz and convertibles.” The show’s star was Efrem Zimbalist Jr., who, as suave detective Stuart “Stu” Bailey, deftly tangled with tough guys, charmed beautiful dames and unraveled mysteries …

Best Retirement Home Ever (for Once-Great Racehorses)

Posted on 05/2/2014 by |Who's News | Comments

Bulletin Today | LegacyJust like the rest of us, the magnificent thoroughbreds that will be running in the Kentucky Derby eventually will grow old. But unlike us, racehorses don’t have Social Security, Medicare and 401(k) plans to rely on in their retirement years, and they don’t have control over their own fate. In the past, tragically, after their breeding days were over, even some great champions such as 1986 Derby winner Ferdinand have ended their lives in foreign slaughterhouses. But fortunately, thanks to the dedication of …

Editor of Mad Magazine as Boomers Remember It Dies

Posted on 05/1/2014 by |Who's News | Comments

Bulletin Today | LegacyMad magazine, edited in its 1960s and 1970s heyday by Al Feldstein, arguably was the most subversive publication on American newsstands — a comic book that, instead of superheroes’ exploits, featured deft parodies of hit movies and Madison Avenue ad campaigns and biting satirical commentary on issues such as racial segregation and the Vietnam War. Here are eight facts about Feldstein, who died on April 30 at age 88 in Livingston, Mont., and how he fostered a style of humor that profoundly …

Chuck Stone: The Columnist Who Saved Lives

Posted on 04/7/2014 by |Who's News | Comments

Bulletin Today | LegacyBack when Chuck Stone was a columnist for the Philadelphia Daily News (from 1972 to 1991), it wouldn’t have been advertising hype to say that he was the most trusted man in the City of Brotherly Love. People put their faith in Stone, who died on April 6 at age 89 in Farmington, N.C. It wasn’t just his street-smart knowledge of the city and the elegant old-school prose decorated with 0bscure words. They believed in his essential goodness, in the …