A Millennial’s Musings on Leaving the Nest … Again

At 32, I didn’t expect to move into my mom’s basement. I also didn’t expect to miss it so much, now that I’m gone. I wrote about my living situation in October. My boyfriend, Joe, and I were just back from Thailand, where I finished my master’s degree and he taught at a university. With our belongings locked in storage, we — yes, both of us — moved in with my mom while we searched for jobs and found our …

Help Beat Hunger in Small Ways, With Love

I believe that anything you really want to do you’ll do with love. That way, it resonates with everyone. As a chef, that’s what my “cooking with love” philosophy is all about. I hug folks with my food. It’s how I nurture people, be it my immediate or extended family or my community — mostly with soulful Southern classics like collard greens, soup beans, corn bread and Nashville’s famous hot chicken. Ending hunger could be a SNAP » Cooking is also …

Why I Sell Nutritious Food Where There Was None

It’s astounding that more than 10 million Americans age 50 and older often go hungry. Many live in areas that don’t have easy access to affordable, nutritious food areas called food deserts—where sometimes convenience stores selling beef jerky and chips play the role of supermarkets. Yet when entrepreneurs or large grocery chains try to open stores in these underserved areas, they typically fail. Why? Because you can’t operate a supermarket in a food desert the same way you would in …

The Best Gift We Can Give Each Other (and It’s Free)

Growing up, we got our Christmas trees from Mr. Munro, the man who owned our house before us. He had studied horticulture in college and taught at a school for years. He owned a tree farm a few hours away from his home, so in his 70s, he decided to sell that home and move to the farm full time. My mom and dad were new to town and in their late 20s — sans kids and dog. Those would come later. …

‘Alzheimer’s Stole Her’: Changing Our Narrative About Dementia

My grandmother lived with Alzheimer’s disease for years. And for years, my family and I would say things like: “Alzheimer’s stole her from us.” “She’s not herself now.” “She’s a shell of who she was.” That’s our cultural narrative about Alzheimer’s disease and other forms of dementia — that it’s the aggressor. It has power over us, we say. It can take away our loved ones right before our eyes. If we’re lucky, we might catch a glimpse of them …

Meet 6 Inspiring Do-Gooders Changing the World

En español | An Episcopal priest and a former judge. A journalist and an artistic director. A doctor and an advocate for impoverished women. They’re the winners of the 2015 Purpose Prize, which recognizes people over age 60 who combine passion and experience to find new ways to solve tough social problems. The prize, announced Nov. 13 by the nonprofit Encore.org, will award a total of $225,000 to the recipients, selected by a jury that included such notables as Michael …