When Scary Headlines Make You Anxious About Millennial Kids

When our millennial children live in another city or away at school, most of the time “out of sight” means “out of mind.” But breaking news headlines can raise our anxiety levels to high alert, and recently that seems almost a daily occurrence. Example: the disappearance and murder of University of Virginia sophomore Hannah Graham. It attracted national media attention during the last few weeks, and no wonder: Many parents immediately related to the story. Grown & Flown blogger Mary …

When Your Kid’s Romance Ends and You Hurt, Too

“They say that breaking up is hard to do. Now I know, I know that it’s true.”  That Neil Sedaka song was recorded twice — in 1962 and in 1975 — a testament to the truth of the lyrics. Breakups are painful, even when it’s not you but your adult child. At a recent wedding, a guest looked wistfully at the joyous couple and mentioned that his twentysomething son had ended a long-term relationship with a woman whom the father …

Why Millennials Are So Self-Centered

Time magazine put our adult children on its cover last year and dubbed them “Generation Me, Me, Me.” In response, some critics noted that several generations — notably baby boomers — could also wear the “all about me” tag. Not so, argues Jean Twenge, a San Diego State University psychology professor. She cites dozens of research studies to make her point that millennials do indeed deserve the “Generation Me” label. That just happens to be the title of her book. …

Mom’s Favorite, Once and Forever

“You were always Mom’s favorite!” The taunt that siblings hurl at one another apparently turns out to be true. Even with adult children, moms tend to favor one child over the others, and the golden child often remains the same over the years, according to J. Jill Suitor, a sociology professor at Purdue University. That favoritism impacts both mother and adult children in negative ways, especially as moms age. When ailing mothers are not cared for by their favorite child, …

The Slow March to Adulthood for Millennials

What defines adulthood? For boomers, the markers were education, marriage and starting a family, usually by our early to mid-20s. For our adult children, those markers often come five to 10 years later, as they take their time finishing a degree (or two) and delay starting a career, finding a life partner and having children. Even then, many don’t consider themselves full-fledged adults. That’s among the findings from a new survey of “established adults, aged 25-39” by Clark University professor …

Why More Generations Are Living Under One Roof

So much for the empty nest. For decades, older Americans have shared the same roof with their adult children. Since the recession, millennials started boomeranging home, and staying and staying, often into their early 30s. In 2012, in fact, a record 57 million Americans – or 18.1 percent of the nation’s population – lived in multigenerational family households. That’s double the number in 1980, according to a new Pew Research Center study. >> Sign up for the AARP Money newsletter The multigenerational …