Perceptions About Social Issues Among African Americans/Blacks Age 50 and Over

In 2014, we conducted a study to examine the importance of key social issues facing African Americans/blacks who are age 50 and older, and also to gauge their optimism in regard to these social issues. The figures and associated infographic were recently updated. >> Visit AARP Research for Information, Insights, and Trends Impacting Americans 50+ The key findings from the study show: Access to high-quality health care and having a financially secure retirement are the most important issues facing age …

Interracial Marriage: The Colors of Love

Through the din of restaurant conversations while at dinner with friends the other night, a question emerged. It was offered in a hushed tone of shock and disbelief, one woman asking another: “Did you know that Donna is going to marry a Negro?” Though muted, it rang in my head like a fire bell, first as a memory from my boyhood, and second, because only those still trapped in America’s terrible days of slavery and segregation would still use such …

Cancer Still Top Killer, But Death Rate Is Dropping

En español I The good news about the cancer death rate over the past 20 years is that it’s dropped 20 percent, according to a new report from the American Cancer Society. The report, published in the American Cancer Society’s journal CA: A Cancer Journal for Clinicians, says the decline translates to roughly 1.3 million people who avoided dying from the disease between 1991, when the death rate hit its peak, and 2010. Much of that progress, notes the report, …

Can Your Race Hamper Caregiving?

What’s it like to be a family caregiver if you’re Hispanic or African American and your loved one has been hospitalized? “Invisible” is one of the words used to describe the experience. “Unprepared” for the enormous responsibilities (injections, tube feedings, wound care, complicated medical issues) post-hospital could be another. To compile the report, “Meeting the Needs of Diverse Caregivers,” just out from the AARP Public Policy Institute, researchers spoke with Hispanics (both English and Spanish speaking) and African Americans as well …

The Takeaway: Census Data Show Growing Racial Gap Between Young and Old

For the first time in U.S. Census Bureau history, white births are no longer a majority. In the year that ended last July, non-Hispanic whites accounted for just 49.6 percent of American births, while minorities””including Hispanics, blacks, Asians and those of mixed race””accounted for 50.4 percent. The demographic shift is playing out differently across the states; white births remain the majority in many areas. In others, however, there’s a growing gap between the ethnic and racial makeup of older and younger Americans.

The Takeaway: Three-Quarters of Minority Retirees Struggling Financially

The majority of Asian, African American and Hispanic retirees in the United States struggle to cover basic living expenses, according to new research from the non-profit Wider Opportunities for Women (WOW).