Caregivers Are Key for This Breast Cancer Survivor

Angela Thornton, a quintessential “people person,” has always loved the company of friends and family. She bakes cakes from scratch and cooks old-fashioned soul food recipes, always enjoying entertaining at her home in Washington, D.C. But Angela, a 55-year-old minister and author, never really knew how much she needed the love of friends and family until last March. That’s when she was diagnosed with breast cancer. Visit AARP Breast Cancer Learning Center » “As strong as I am, as much …

Experts Argue Against New Mammogram Guidelines

The American Cancer Society’s newly announced change in mammogram guidelines has made the debate on when, and how frequently, to get breast cancer screening even more confusing for women. Even worse, this change was based on the advice of a panel  that “did not include a single surgeon, radiologist or medical oncologist who specializes in the care and treatment of breast cancer. Not one,” said an op-ed column in the New York Times written by three breast cancer experts who …

What Would You Ask Robin Roberts?

Here’s a chance for you to be part of our conversation with the keynote speaker at AARP’s Life@50+ National Event in Miami. Robin Roberts, the 54-year-old coanchor of ABC’s Good Morning America, is the most trusted person on television, according to recent surveys. She has openly shared both the highs and the lows of her life story with us as she’s steadily moved onto ever-widening public stages. We have watched Roberts on difficult personal journeys, including the deaths of both …

A Mammogram at Age 50 or 40? The Debate Continues

Six years ago a federal panel of medical experts said women didn’t need to start getting routine mammograms until they were 50 — not 40, as other medical groups had long advised — and then only every two years. The announcement set off a heated debate, and most older women ended up ignoring the advice. This week, the panel released a proposed updated version of those 2009 recommendations, and not much has changed. Including the debate. The panel, the U.S. …

Why Angelina Jolie Chose to Have Her Ovaries Removed

Nearly two years after announcing she had gotten a preventive double mastectomy and encouraging women to get tested for the BRCA1 breast cancer gene, actress and director Angelina Jolie says she has had her ovaries and Fallopian tubes removed to reduce her risk of ovarian cancer, the disease that killed her mother at age 56. As she did in 2013, Jolie wrote an essay for the New York Times explaining that she carries a gene that gives her “an estimated …

The Jolie Effect: A Jump in Breast Cancer Gene Testing

Just how big of an effect did movie star Angelina Jolie have on women getting tested for the BRCA breast cancer gene? A hefty 40 percent jump, according to the first study to look at the impact of Jolie’s announcement that she had undergone testing. The study by the AARP Public Policy Institute analyzed more than 6.5 million health insurance claims for women 35 and older during 2013. Researchers found that testing rates increased from about 350 a week prior …