When Is ‘No Treatment’ the Best Treatment?

The swift, lethal nature of brain cancer — and the terrible decisions it forces families to face — has been in the news recently, with three of its victims forcing us to think about choices we hope we never have to make. There was, of course, the well-publicized death of Brittany Maynard, 29, diagnosed with the most common and deadly form of brain cancer — glioblastoma. Doctors don’t know what causes these insidious growths, according to the National Brain Tumor …

Too Much Milk May Cause Bone Fractures, But Yogurt’s OK

Despite everything we’ve been told about milk building strong bones and making us healthy, that may not be the case once we’re middle-aged adults, a new Swedish study suggests. Researchers from Uppsala University followed more than 100,000 men (ages 45 to 79) and women (ages 39 to 74) for up to 20 years and found that those who drank three or more glasses of milk a day had a higher rate of death. Even more troubling, the women had more, …

Top 10 Medical Innovations for 2015

What medical innovations will have the biggest impact in 2015? At the Cleveland Clinic’s annual Medical Innovation Summit this week, the top 10 list included a high-tech stroke ambulance, painless blood testing, new cancer therapies and a vaccine that could help 50 million to 100 million people in more than 100 countries. The list of up-and-coming technologies and drug therapies was chosen by a panel of 110 physicians and scientists, and announced at the conference in Cleveland. Here are their …

That Store Receipt Could Be Bad for Your Health

The next time the cashier asks, “Would you like your receipt?” the healthiest response might be, “No thanks!” That’s because a small but troubling new study finds that touching a cash register receipt can increase your body’s absorption of a controversial chemical used in the receipt’s coating. The chemical is bisphenol A, or BPA, which has been at the center of debate for decades over its use in plastic water bottles, baby bottles and the linings of cans of food. …

Missteps in U.S. Ebola Protection Plan Continue

Let’s see: A nurse who cared for a dying Ebola patient is allowed to fly on a commercial flight days later despite having a low-grade fever. Another worker who handled the patient’s lab specimens takes a cruise and has to be quarantined aboard the ship. Officials with the hospital where the man died admit nurses were never given Ebola training. Is this how the U.S. thinks it will protect citizens against this disease? The head of the U.S. Centers for …

Ebola’s Here. Should You Be Worried?

The country’s first Ebola patient—Thomas Eric Duncan, who was visiting Dallas from West Africa—has died. But the fact that he was mistakenly sent home when he first showed up at a Texas hospital complaining of symptoms, does not exactly inspire confidence in our healthcare system. Especially considering that CDC director Thomas Frieden said in a Tuesday news conference that “we’re stopping [Ebola] in its tracks in this country.” I mean, you gotta wonder: Can we be sure? After all, Duncan told a hospital nurse that …