cataracts

11 Things We Didn’t Know Last Week

Posted on 01/8/2014 by | News, Culture, Sights and Sounds | Comments

11 Things | Bulletin Today News, discoveries and fun … 1. It got so cold in Kentucky that an escaped prisoner turned himself back in. (Learn more at Associated Press) Tweets about “#polarvortex” 2. Eating certain foods can reduce your risk of developing cataracts. (Learn more at AARP) 3. Siri, Apple’s voice-activated personal assistant, isn’t so keen about her purring counterpart in the new movie Her, but suggests seeing the movie anyway. (Learn more at Wired)   4. A newspaper in Vancouver, Wash., discovered an undeveloped roll of …

What You Eat Could Lower Your Risk of Cataracts

Posted on 01/3/2014 by | Personal Health and Well-being | Comments

Bulletin Today | Personal HealthTo help your aging eyes, think about improving what you eat. A new Swedish study has found that women age 49 and older who ate a diet rich in disease-fighting antioxidants had a lower risk of developing cataracts. The team of Swedish researchers looked at the diets of more than 30,000 women ages 49 to 83 and found those with the highest total intake of antioxidants had about a 13 percent lower risk of developing cataracts than women who consumed …

Look Into My Eyes: Dilation Exam Can Spot 7 Diseases

Posted on 05/6/2013 by | Personal Health and Well-being | Comments

Bulletin Today | Personal HealthDo you really need to have your eyes dilated with eyedrops at your annual eye exam?  Short answer: Yes, you should — especially as you get older or if you are at risk for eye problems. May is Healthy Vision Month, and the National Eye Institute is encouraging Americans to take the necessary steps to protect their vision. According to the institute, about 38 million Americans over age 40 have glaucoma, diabetic retinopathy, age-related macular degeneration or cataracts. And that number is …

How Well Do You See Colors?

Posted on 11/12/2012 by | Personal Health and Well-being | Comments

Bulletin Today | Personal HealthDo you have “color vision deficiency,” otherwise known as color blindness? It affects about 32 million Americans — eight percent of men, 0.5 percent of women — but there are now new websites and smartphone apps to help people identify difficult-to-see shades and hues, the Wall Street Journal reports. In addition, be aware that changes in color vision in older adults could be a sign of other health problems or the side effect of certain medications, including Viagra and some …