Civil Rights Giant Julian Bond Never Stopped Giving

President Obama described him as a “hero” who “helped changed this country for the better.” The Rev. Jesse Jackson called him a “leader with strength, character.” NAACP Chairman Roslyn Brock said he “inspired a generation of civil rights leaders.”  Teresa Sullivan, president of the University of Virginia, where he taught history for many years, called him a beloved retired professor who “shaped the course of history through his life and work.” Visit AARP Black Community » How ever you choose to describe …

Julian Bond: Civil Rights Activist

In the 1960s, student civil rights activist-turned-Georgia legislator Julian Bond, who passed away Aug. 15 at age 75 in Fort Walton Beach, Fla., cut such a charismatic figure with his slim, handsome looks and dazzling gift for oratory that some envisioned him becoming the first African-American U.S. President. Instead, that political pinnacle eventually was achieved by Barack Obama, who shared many of Bond’s attributes. But Bond, who went on to become chairman of the NAACP from 1998 to 2010, helped …

10 Things to Tell Our Youth About Being Stopped by Police

Peace of mind: That’s one quality of life that none of us can buy. And there’s nothing that gives us more peace of mind than to know that our beloved children, grandchildren, nieces and nephews are safe and happy. But, lately, a string of news stories about police shootings of unarmed black men has made us a little more uneasy. Giving Back | Share Your Experience in Your Community » Of course our children can’t always be in our sight. And …

Black Press Still Pleading the Cause for African Americans

Growing up in Philadelphia, I remember my father always stopping at the corner store for a copy of the Philadelphia Tribune, our black newspaper. It was my go-to source for school papers and other projects. You could always find it on the coffee table of our home and at the homes of many of our neighbors. Today, the advent of social media, phone cameras and 21st-century technology are often credited for the exposure of police shootings of unarmed black men …

Paying Tribute to an Ancestor Extraordinaire

Deborah Williams of Richfield, Minn., never got to meet her grandfather, Harry Henry Hill. But she knows his story: The black boy who lost his parents in the late 1800s and left school at age 12 became a single dad to six — count ’em, six — daughters and raised them on his own during a period of intense racial discrimination and prejudice against African Americans. Williams’ compelling story about her beloved grandfather is the winner of AARP’s Tribute to …

A Salute to the Women Fighting to Maintain Voting Rights

On Bloody Sunday, March 7, 1965, the Alabama State Police spared no activists — not even the women — on Selma’s Edmund Pettus Bridge. They, too, were knocked to the ground, trampled by horses and struck by batons, just like the men — all for standing for the rights of African Americans to vote. As America continues to commemorate the nobility of all of the activists credited for the Voting Rights Act of 1965, Women’s History Month is also an …