cognitive function

Test Your Brain With the Toughest Tongue Twister Ever

Posted on 12/9/2013 by |Personal Health and Well-being | Comments

Brain Health | Bulletin TodayTry saying this 10 times fast: “pad kid poured curd pulled cod.” If you can do it, a team of scientists at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) just might give you a prize. The team has been researching tongue twisters, those seemingly simple words or phrases that when spoken quickly and repeatedly make our brains stumble and our tongues get tangled. The researchers are interested in what tongue-twister errors can tell us about how our brains process speech. The …

Young vs. Old: Which Workers Are More Consistent?

Posted on 08/12/2013 by |Personal Health and Well-being | Comments

Bulletin Today | Personal HealthHaving a bad day at work? If you are, you’re probably in your 20s, says a new German study that finds that workers age 65-plus are cognitively more consistent, reliable and productive than workers much younger. The researchers, from the Max Planck Institute for Human Development in Berlin, wanted to see if there really were “good” and “bad” days in terms of cognitive performance on the job, and whether age made a difference, according to the study published last month …

SuperAgers: They’re 80, But Their Brains Are Only 50

Posted on 08/17/2012 by |Personal Health and Well-being | Comments

Bulletin Today | Personal HealthThey’re age 80 and older, yet they have the memory and brain power of people in their 50s. So what’s their secret? That’s what researchers at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine are trying to figure out. A new study found that this elite group of elderly — or SuperAgers, as researchers call them — have brains that appear as young as people in the prime of middle-age. In fact, one brain region of this SuperAger group was even bigger …

Caregivers May Benefit From Their Role

Posted on 10/21/2011 by |Aging, Home & Family Expert | Comments

CaregivingFinally some good news about caregiving! I recently spoke with Dr. Lisa Fredman,  a professor of epidemiology and biostatistics  at the Boston University School of Public Health, who has been studying the effects of caregiving on stress levels. She and her colleagues have been following about 1,000 older women, 375 of whom were caregivers. Not surprisingly, the caregivers showed significantly more stress than non-caregivers. What amazed me, though, was how that stress actually affected – or didn’t affect – the …