Is Your Community Walkable?

Post by Nancy LeaMond: When we see the yellow school bus making its rounds and picking up kids, we know it’s time to turn around and head home. So go the early morning walks with one of my friends from the neighborhood. We’ve been meeting at the corner of a nearby school for years. We talk about health, careers, family, local arts and theater, good TV, bad TV. Stay Informed: Sign up for the AARP Livable Communities Newsletter Walking is a …

What Are Complete Streets?

Do you have easy access to schools, parks, medical facilities and simple services like grocery and drug stores? Do you have alternative transportation options when the car is in the shop?  Does your neighborhood have sidewalks? And if so, are they well maintained? If you are like the large majority of Americans, your plan is to stay in your community – if not in your very same home – as you get older. However, in order to do so, you …

Road Safety for Every Age

As part of Global Road Safety Week (May 6-12), AARP joins many other organizations, governments and individuals working to raise awareness about the dangers facing pedestrians. Walking is good for your health and it doesn’t cost a dime. Unfortunately, it isn’t always safe. A pedestrian in America is three times more likely to die in a motor vehicle crash than in Germany, and six times more likely to die than in the Netherlands. Many U.S. communities either lack sidewalks, have …

What Is a Complete Street?

Like many people my age, it’s easy for me to put off the thought of setting aside the car keys one day. But recently, and especially with the snowy weather in my town lately, it’s been on my mind. As I traveled the nearly deserted streets of Port Townsend, Wash., by foot last week and noted that cars were slow and drivers courteous, I thought about the country’s need for “complete streets.” You may have heard this term before but …

Improving Towns One Walk at a Time

Throughout the year, even yesterday, my birthday, I get together with residents and leaders of communities to do something that is too rare these days: walk. And not just to walk for fun, but to help people see their streets through a new lens, one that focuses on how street design either supports or discourages active living and active transportation. Usually during these “walking audits,” as we call them, curious motorists gawk at the strange sight of people actually – …

How Complete Are Your Streets?

I’ve done it. You’ve done it. Most Americans have probably done it. So, what’s the big deal? I’m talking about jaywalking. And not the kind Leno does on the Tonight Show.