Technology’s Brave New World: Crossing the Digital Divide

Charlotte Whittaker – AARP Kentucky Volunteer It’s a Brave New World and I want to be a part of it – online. Growing up in rural west Kentucky, I never imagined having the world at my fingertips. But, my tablet and my smartphone both fit in my purse and they are my ticket to the Web and everything I want to know. I was thrilled when invited to join AARP Live on RFD-TV and talk about how I’m using technology …

Apple Enters the Health Gizmo Market With New Watch

Half of Apple’s announcement Sept. 9 was predictable: The iPhone 6 and 6 plus are bigger, faster, more powerful and slimmer than previous iPhones. Prices on older models have plunged and the new phones seem well priced. But for something really new, Apple’s big play was a watch that is supposed to make everyone — or at least everyone with $349 to spend — live a longer, healthier life.  >> Faded Fitness Fads That Boomers Loved and Left There are fitness and …

On Grandparents Day, Let’s Get Connected Through Technology!

Many of us still fondly remember talking on the old-fashioned rotary dial phone with the curly cord. At one time, just about every home had one. But when it comes to the new forms of communications and technology, there is a digital divide between old and young that needs swift action. And AARP is seeking to close the gap with online training in digital technology especially suited for people who are age 50-plus. With Grandparents Day on Sunday, Sept. 7, …

WebTV: The Internet Revolution That Wasn’t

  Back in the mid-1990s, when PCs cost thousands of dollars and required a fair amount of technological savvy to set up and operate, WebTV seemed like the next big thing: an easier, cheaper ($300) way to get online and experience the still-newfangled wonders of the World Wide Web. “After spending a couple of weeks using WebTV,” BusinessWeek technology columnist Stephen H. Wildstrom gushed in 1996, “I think we may now have the product that could turn the World Wide Web …

Should Everyone Be Able to Read This Story?

If you’re reading this, you probably have little reason to think about the one in five Americans who, unlike you, have no easy access to the Internet. An ambitious new initiative, called “Everyone On,” aims to close the “digital divide,” but some experts are already complaining that the nonprofit organization driving the campaign, Connect2Compete, has left older people in its rearview mirror. Nobody would say that young people who can’t afford computers or don’t have tech-savvy parents shouldn’t be given every …