Andy Granatelli: The Indomitable Showman

Though he immodestly titled his memoirs They Call Me Mister 500, Andy Granatelli actually was behind the wheel at the famed Indianapolis Motor Speedway just once, in the time trials in 1948. Back then, he was billed “Antonio the Great, Famed Italian Speed Ace,” even though he hailed from Chicago and had raced only a few times, on state fairgrounds and small tracks in the Midwest. Despite the hype, Granatelli’s career as an Indy driver ended ignominiously, when he crashed, …

11 Things We Didn’t Know Last Week

News, discoveries and fun …   1. Dr. Phil has a $65,000 “fountain of youth” pod — reportedly one of only 16 in the world — in his house. (Learn more at AARP) 2.Passengers and crew members on a flight diverted to Newfoundland on Sept. 11, 2001, have helped send to college more than 130 students from Lewisporte, the tiny Canadian town that took in the flight members. (Learn more at AARP) 3. Researchers at Carnegie Mellon University in Pittsburgh have …

Computer-Operated Car Takes Congressman for a Ride

Rep. Bill Shuster (R-Pa.) yelled at his driver on the way to the airport on Sept. 6, but the driver didn’t even bother to respond. It was a computer. Shuster, the chairman of the House Transportation and Infrastructure Committee, was testing a driverless car, designed by Carnegie Mellon University researchers, on a 30-mile ride to Pittsburgh International Airport. One of the researchers was positioned in the driver’s seat — just in case. (Or maybe to make sure that people in other …

Car Talk — The Future of Driving Safety

Editor’s note. This is the first in a series from Ford that will talk about older drivers, technology and the future of transportation. Today’s post is by Mike Shulman, Technical Leader for Ford Active Safety Research. Like many fans of the NPR program Car Talk, I’ll miss the entertaining banter of brothers Ray and Tom Magliozzi (otherwise known as Click and Clack, the Tappet Brothers). No one can turn a car calamity into comic relief quite like they can! The …

Lessons from the Bullying Video That Went Viral

The following is a guest post from Bill Hogan, a writer and editor on the AARP Media News team. “Sticks and stones may break my bones, but words will never hurt me.” How many of us had to say that in “repeat-after-me” drills when we were growing up? I don’t know about you, but I never really believed it. Words can hurt. Millions of us could see that in the video-gone-viral of Karen Huff Klein, a 68-year-old school bus monitor …