Tapping Into Help for Hearing Loss by Smartphone

I used to have perfect hearing, although I could select what I didn’t want to hear. But now that I’m getting older, I am becoming more concerned about my hearing. I am also a recent cancer survivor, truly thankful for every day that I wake up. One side effect of my chemo treatment is auditory nerve damage. I can still hear well enough so I don’t need a hearing aid. But it got me thinking: How do you hold a …

Hearing Loss? Denial Doesn’t Work. Trust Me.

Boomers and beyond: It may be time to face up to the fact that you probably have hearing loss. An estimated 48 million Americans do, and 55 percent of them are under the age of 60. It’s easy to ignore, but your life will be much better if you don’t.  Like many people, I spent years — decades! — denying that my hearing loss was a problem. It came on suddenly and strongly, so I couldn’t deny its existence. But I did …

Now Hear This: Hearing Aids Can Be Stylish

My hearing loss was gradual, hereditary and profound. And I denied it was happening every step of the way. Though I was only 60 years old, I would replay key scenes in Netflix episodes, max out the volume on SiriusXM radio and fudge my way through conversations on the phone, at parties and in noisy restaurants. Finally I faced reality and got my ears checked by a doctor, then grudgingly went to see an audiologist about getting hearing aids. But …

Diane Keaton Has 7 Ways to Age With Attitude

Diane Keaton’s new memoir, Let’s Just Say It Wasn’t Pretty (Random House), is like reading your best friend’s diary. Provided your BFF is a famously funny actress, of course. Up close, I found out when I interviewed the 68-year-old star in New York City last week, Keaton, a L’Oreal Paris spokesmodel, is attractive, scarily smart and a complex mix of confident and quirky. I scrambled to keep pace as she covered all sorts of fashion and beauty topics related to …

Eew, Earwax: To Clean or Not to Clean It Out

What is it with our obsession with earwax? We pick, prod, dig, candle, irrigate, swab and vac it out, sometimes with harmful results. A fascinating story in the Wall Street Journal today has an earful of stunning facts, including: Some 12 million Americans visit medical professionals annually for earwax removal. Millions more have it done at spas and ear-candling parlors, which theoretically suck out earwax with a lighted candle. North Americans also spent $63 million last year on home ear-cleaning …