Vitamin E May Slow Alzheimer’s Progression

We haven’t discovered a cure for Alzheimer’s, or a drug that reverses the ravages of the disease, but researchers may have found a treatment to slow disease progression that’s simple, cheap and safe. Among more than 600 patients with mild to moderate Alzheimer’s disease, a daily high dose of vitamin E slowed the decline in the ability of patients to perform everyday tasks, such as dress or bathe independently, by about six months on average. And, perhaps more tellingly, those taking …

Good News About Exercise: It’s Never too Late to Start

Need inspiration to head out to that Turkey Trot in the frightful weather? A new study finds that regular physical activity later in life boosts the likelihood of healthy aging up to sevenfold. What’s more, the findings, published yesterday in the British Journal of Sports Medicine, show that it’s never too late to start. “Significant health benefits were even seen among participants who became physically active relatively late in life,” wrote the study authors, led by Mark Hamer of the …

Exercise Boosts Memory in Adults Over 50

Want to stay mentally sharp? Just an hour of exercise three times a week can improve memory and brain health in as little as six weeks, according to a small new study. For the study, researchers at the Center for BrainHealth at the University of Texas at Dallas divided sedentary adults from the ages of 57 to 75 into an exercise group and a control group. The exercise group rode on a stationary bike or walked on a treadmill for …

Are Heavy Metals Evildoers in Alzheimer’s Disease?

Does Alzheimer’s confuse you? You’re not alone. In fact, one of the great mysteries of modern science is the question of what actually causes Alzheimer’s disease. For several years a group of Alzheimer’s disease researchers have believed that metals such as iron and copper play a role. Now a new study supports that theory. Researchers at the University of Rochester Medical Center found that copper may trigger the onset of Alzheimer’s disease. Rashid Deane, Ph.D., lead author of the study, …

Recognize These Folks? If Not, You May Be in Trouble…

  Can you name the famous faces above? If not, you may be headed for a type of early dementia. A new study suggests that a simple test that measures the ability to recognize and name famous people may help doctors identify a type of early dementia in people ages 40 to 65. Researchers at Northwestern University tested 30 people with primary progressive aphasia, a type of dementia that first affects language, and 27 people without dementia. The test includes …