Happy With Your Body? Only 12 Percent of Older Women Are

It’s young women who are obsessed with their body appearance - not mature women over 50, right? Oh, who are we kidding. Even us wise older women fret about our bodies. My slim, petite friend Marianne, who’s 99, still watches her figure. In fact, a recent survey found that only 12 percent of women over 50 are satisfied with their bodies. Twelve percent! That’s pretty sad. Sign up for the AARP Health Newsletter So what’s so special about those 12 percent? …

Rx for Heart Disease: Take 2 Walks and Call Me in the Morning

A major new study finds that exercise is as good – or in some cases better – than prescription drugs in protecting against future heart attacks, stroke and diabetes. The study, conducted by researchers from Harvard and Stanford universities, is among a very few trials that have directly compared an exercise regimen with medication. Researchers compared their effectiveness for patients with heart disease, heart failure and pre-type 2 diabetes, and

To Prevent Uterine Cancer, Think Coffee Not Cake

It doesn’t get as much attention as breast cancer, but uterine cancer – also referred to as endometrial cancer – primarily strikes women over 60, killing more than 8,000 a year. Now a new report by the American Institute for Cancer Research (AICR) and World Cancer Research Fund International estimates that nearly 60 percent, or 29,500 cases, of uterine cancer annually could be prevented if women maintained a healthy weight and got regular exercise. They also need to drink a …

Why We Should Stop Seeking the ‘Best’ Diet

Is the paleo diet the best for losing weight? Or how about Weight Watchers? Maybe low fat? South Beach? Atkins? Oh, stop. This whole debate over the “ideal” diet is misleading, and researchers and the media need to knock it off, says weight-management expert and psychologist Sherry Pagoto, Ph.D., with the University of Massachusetts Medical School. Pagoto, an associate professor who also counsels weight-management patients at the university’s Weight Center, says there really is no such thing as the “best” …

To Reduce Diabetes Risk: Eat. Stroll. Repeat.

There used to be a tradition of taking a little walk after dinner to aid digestion. Turns out, a short walk after eating can do even more: It can help reduce the risk of diabetes in older adults by lowering blood sugar levels for hours after a meal, a new study finds. The research from George Washington University’s School of Public Health and Health Services looked at whether a 15-minute walk after each meal was better for blood sugar levels …

How to Beat Fitness Saboteurs

You may have noticed that for the most part, my articles focus on the positive aspects of getting fit. (I have found the upside so incredible that I wonder why it took me so long to make positive changes.) At the same time, I recognize the downside: when we decide to make changes and get fit, some of us will find ourselves dealing with individuals who seek to undermine our efforts. Related: The #1 Best All-Around Exercise for Every Post-50 …