11 Things We Didn’t Know Last Week

News, discoveries and … fun 1. Chameleons change colors by enlarging or contracting small crystals in their skin that reflect different hues. (Learn more at USA Today) 2. It’s only human to buy high and sell low, especially in the stock market. (Learn more at AARP) 3. After menopause, female killer whales provide key information that is critical to their pod’s survival. (Learn more at National Geographic) 4. Jimi Hendrix recorded with a group called Curtis Knight & the Squires. (Learn more …

Want to Lose Weight? Add This One Thing to Your Diet

You want to get to a healthy weight, but let’s face it — diets can have a lot of complicated rules. Wouldn’t it be nice if there was just one simple thing to add to what you eat each day to help you shed some pounds? University of Massachusetts Medical School researchers wondered the same thing, and now they think they have an answer: Eat more fiber. In a yearlong study, published in the Annals of Internal Medicine, those who …

Cereal, Grains Key to Longer Life After Heart Attack

Eating a high-fiber diet can help you avoid heart disease, but what if you’ve already had a heart attack – can adding fiber to your diet help you live longer? A study that researchers say is the first to examine this question has some good news for heart patients: The more fiber heart attack survivors add to their diet – especially in the form of cereal and whole grains – the lower their risk of dying from any cause, said …

The Healthiest Fast Food Oatmeals

Oatmeal is a hearty, healthy breakfast option, and now you can even find it at your favorite fast-food chain or take-out café. It’s a warm and wise choice for starting the day. Studies show that regularly eating oatmeal, which is low in fat and high in fiber, helps reduce cholesterol and decrease blood pressure, as well as lessen the risk for diabetes – assuming you’re not overloading your bowl with sugary toppings, of course. O-to-go probably got its biggest boost …

For Weight Loss and Optimum Health, Tip the Scale with Fiber

For too long, fiber has been a neglected orphan in the American food family. Gritty drinks, supersized pills and cardboard-like bran cereal seemed to be the only alternatives for adding fiber to one’s diet. Maybe the lack of options explains why the typical American consumes only half of the recommended daily amount of fiber (25 to 38 grams). Fiber’s numerous health benefits, however, cannot safely be ignored. A reduced risk of heart disease is one important benefit of a high-fiber …