Financial Planning for People With Dementia

As boomers move into their late 60s and beyond, the country is likely to experience a growing number of individuals with dementia who have difficulty managing their financial affairs. This means financial advisers must be trained to recognize the early signs of cognitive impairment among clients and then plan for deteriorating mental health that may occur over many years. In addition, policymakers must bolster protections against financial exploitation to protect older consumers with dementia. >> 10 Items Where Coupons Save …

Should You Sell When Your Fund Manager Quits?

So, the star manager of your mutual fund leaves. Should you bail, too? It’s a question on many investors’ minds now after famed bond manager Bill Gross announced Friday he was leaving the company he founded, Pacific Investment Management Co., to start another fund at rival Janus. The Wall Street Journal reported today that investors so far have pulled $10 billion out of Pimco —  and $90 billion more may follow. “You have to be careful not to have a knee-jerk …

The Financial Burden of Being a Family Caregiver

Caring for family or friends is not just a matter of love and time, it’s also a matter of dollars and cents. According to a new survey from Caring.com, nearly half of caregivers spend more than $5,000 per year — a whopping $25,000 over the average caregiving stint of five years. And many spend far more. Complicating things is the reluctance of caregivers to talk about finances: Seven out of 10 have not spoken with loved ones about how to …

Jean Chatzky: Our Relationship With Money Is a ‘Hot Mess’

Jean Chatzky has a few choice words for how most folks describe their relationship with money: Confusing. Frightening. Chaotic. Stressful. Precarious. “For two decades now, I’ve been watching how we make our money, save it, spend it, borrow it, invest it and protect it,” Chatzky told an audience today at the AARP Ideas@50+ conference underway in San Diego. “And I can tell you that, overall, our relationship with money is a hot mess.” Chatzky, AARP’s financial ambassador, is a best-selling author and …

Are ‘Lazy Portfolios’ Right for You?

If you think investing has to be complex and require constant monitoring, then think again. As it happens, the best strategy for growing one’s nest egg over the past decade may have come down to being lazy. Let me explain. About a decade ago, Paul Farrell wrote the book The Lazy Person’s Guide to Investing (Business Plus, 2004). He’s been tracking the performance of these portfolios ever since, which can be viewed live at the MarketWatch Lazy Portfolio page. Eight of the portfolios …

Your New Retirement Number: $58,000

En español | Financial experts seem to speculate endlessly about boomers’ projected lifestyle in retirement based on their savings and spending patterns. Now a new survey that polled recent retirees about their standard of living has found that, for some, you don’t need a lot of money each year to retire comfortably and live happily. According to the survey by Baltimore-based investment firm T. Rowe Price, recent retirees report living on 66 percent of their pre-retirement income on average – $58,000 …