The $64,000 Question: Where Did My Retirement Savings Go?

Investment advice should be free of conflicts of interest The way Americans save for retirement has changed drastically over the past few decades. Thirty years ago, the typical worker had a pension through his or her job. Today, if workers have a retirement plan at all, it is likely a 401(k) or IRA. Why does this matter? Because now more than ever, individuals must make the complicated decisions about financial security in retirement: what to invest in, how much, how to …

Questions Candidates Should Answer to Get Your Vote

Election Day is almost here. Yet too many candidates wait until after the polls close before taking positions on key issues that matter to you and your family. That’s why AARP developed voters’ guides for the 435 U.S. House, 36 U.S. Senate and hundreds of state races. These nonpartisan guides will help you cut through the political clutter to what the candidates are saying — and what they’re not saying — about the issues that matter to you and your …

The Financial Burden of Being a Family Caregiver

Caring for family or friends is not just a matter of love and time, it’s also a matter of dollars and cents. According to a new survey from Caring.com, nearly half of caregivers spend more than $5,000 per year — a whopping $25,000 over the average caregiving stint of five years. And many spend far more. Complicating things is the reluctance of caregivers to talk about finances: Seven out of 10 have not spoken with loved ones about how to …

What Happens to Your Pension When the Company Goes Bust?

Studebaker auto workers found out the hard way in 1963. When the Studebaker Corp. shut down its plant in South Bend, Ind., workers who had been promised pensions saw their hard-earned benefits vanish in an instant. Instead of receiving fixed payments throughout retirement, thousands of employees were forced to take one-time lump sums worth a fraction of what they’d earned. Thousands more received no benefits at all. The Studebaker Corp. had been promising pension benefits to its employees, but in …

Cut Social Security? Say Goodbye to Older Voters

Seventy-nine years after its creation, Social Security remains a vital key to Americans’ retirement security. And with the 2014 elections less than three months away, strengthening the program is a top priority for older voters, according to a new AARP survey of voters 50 and older. The message to candidates is clear: Stop treating Social Security like a line item in a budget. Older voters have earned their benefits through a lifetime of hard work and paying into the system. …

Good News: You Can Still Get Your Benefits Verified at Your Social Security Office

Need to get your Social Security benefits verified? There’s good news: You can still get it done at your Social Security office. Why is that news? Because late last year, the Social Security Administration announced that its field offices would no longer assist people in obtaining verification letters. Instead, it planned to direct anyone requesting a letter to either call an 800 number or go online to find and print the document. AARP, along with other advocacy groups and members …