Job Scams: Tip-Offs to Rip-Offs

Looking for a job? Whether full time or seasonal — retailers expect to hire up to 690,000 workers for the holiday shopping season — here are the tip-offs to employment opportunity rip-offs. You have to pay. Along with classic cons such as requiring applicants to pay up front for supposed background or credit checks, drug testing or other due diligence (typically handled by employers), newer job scams include asking for money (again, before you start working) for equipment, certifications, training …

Taking Aim at Veterans’ Nest Eggs

Military veterans are frequently targeted by fraudsters, but perhaps the most insidious are self-described “veterans advocates” who take aim at retirement nest eggs. Some promise lump-sum cash payouts for veterans’ pensions and future benefits. But officials warn that those advances typically pay only pennies on the dollar of the pension’s actual worth and can carry loan shark-like interest rates (reports range up to 106 percent). Some charge hefty fees for services like filing pension or other claims or getting military …

Campaign Calls: Many From Candidates, More From Con Artists

With only a few days left until the presidential election, your phone may be ringing with political robocalls that 3 in 4 voters say they wouldn’t answer, knowing they were on behalf of a candidate, according to a recent Harris Poll survey. Better incentive not to pick up: More common than the hundreds of thousands of legitimate campaign calls made each month are those from political-poser con artists angling for your personal information and money. During this election season political …

The Mystery Shopper Scam in 3 Easy Steps

The mystery shopper scam is back. And if history holds true, expect this longtime scheme (and perennial top seasonal job scam) to only snowball through the holiday shopping season. It’s no mystery: Checks that new recruits receive for being a “mystery shopper” are as fake as the promise behind them. Make easy money — and plenty of it — by stealthily reviewing local restaurants and retailers, including Walmart, Best Buy and Home Depot, for $200 or more per assignment. Ways …

Courting Trouble: Jury Duty Scam Is Back

Having continued for more than a decade, the jury duty scam remains one of the most successful multipurpose intimidation impostor schemes. Fraudsters can not only get a quick payoff but also enough personal details for future identity theft. Usually, the deception is about failing to appear for mandated jury duty, although some targets are told they skipped a court-summoned order to appear as a defendant, are in contempt or have a federal warrant out for their arrest. Ways to save, …

In Spotting Scams, Older Is Wiser

Despite the popular perception — more likely, because of it — those at highest risk of falling for a scam are millennials, not their grandparents or parents. So says the Better Business Bureau (BBB) after polling some 2,000 adults in the U.S. and Canada about perceived personal vulnerability to scams and who they think is most likely to fall victim. (Participants were unaware that the BBB was behind the survey.) The majority of respondents believed that the typical scam victim …