Tackling Prescription Drug Abuse among Older Adults

Prescription drug abuse is a serious and growing public health issue in the United States. While media attention and policy efforts often focus on younger populations, older adults are not immune to the problem. A new AARP Public Policy Institute report finds that while the prevalence of prescription drug misuse is higher among younger ages, it would be a mistake to overlook such behavior among older adults. Here’s why. First, a number of factors make older adults more susceptible to …

AARP’s Health Care Roundup July 28, 2017

As the Senate defeated the “skinny” health care repeal bill this morning, AARP thanked Republican Senators Susan Collins, John McCain, and Lisa Murkowski, as well as Senate Democrats and Independents for opposing the bill. AARP strongly opposed all of the health care repeal bills this week, because each which would ultimately have resulted in higher costs and less coverage for Americans age 50-plus. Here are recent activities of note: AARP Executive Vice President Nancy LeaMond’s Statement on “Skinny” Health Care …

AARP’s Health Care Roundup July 27, 2017

As the Senate plans to vote on the so-called “skinny” health care repeal bill, AARP continues its strong opposition to all of the health care repeal bills, which would ultimately result in higher costs and less coverage for older Americans. Here is our most recent activity surrounding the health care repeal bills: AARP Executive Vice President Nancy LeaMond’s Statement on “Skinny” Health Care Bill Huffington Post —Who Is Your Senator More Afraid Of: Mitch McConnell Or AARP? The Hill “Congress …

Under the Senate Health Bill, All Older Adults Would Pay Much More for Individual Health Coverage

The just-released Senate bill, the Better Care Reconciliation Act (BCRA), is very bad news for older adults. The bill would reduce financial assistance (premium tax credits and cost-sharing subsidies) and change rules on how much premiums can vary by age (age rating). As a result, people ages 50 to 64 would have to pay thousands of dollars more in premiums to buy health insurance in the individual (nongroup) market. Here are four ways the bill would increase the cost of …

If You Get Health Insurance From Your Job, the Health Care Debate’s Outcome Could Still Hurt You

People with health insurance through large employers may assume the outcome of the current health debate won’t affect them. But it can. To start, yesterday the Congressional Budget Office (CBO) estimated that 3 million people would lose employer-based insurance coverage as a result of changes proposed in the American Health Care Act (AHCA). But the bill’s harmful effects would reach far beyond those 3 million people; in fact, virtually everyone is vulnerable. Here’s how: In times of change, people turn …

The Fierce Urgency of Now: How $880 Billion in Cuts to Medicaid Could Hurt Us All

If you have protection against future catastrophic out-of-pocket costs for basic life functions, consider yourself lucky. The vast majority of people in the United States don’t. Yet the reality is that there’s a 52 percent chance that someone turning 65 today might develop a severe disability requiring long-term services and supports (LTSS)—that is, help with such functions as eating, bathing, dressing and toileting. For more extensive care, the cost can surpass $250,000 for those over the age of 65 — …