“health care”

How to Keep Track of What Your Doctor Said

Posted on 03/4/2014 by | Health | Comments

Bulletin Today | Personal HealthBy Susan Jaffe, Kaiser Health News. Story produced in collaboration with USA Today It used to be difficult for Edith Couturier, an 85-year-old resident of the District of Columbia, to explain to her adult children on the West Coast all the details of her medical appointments. But now she doesn’t go alone — she takes along a volunteer “medical note-taker.” “There are four ears listening to what the doctor says,” Couturier says. That second set of ears belongs to Sharon Wolozin, …

CVS to Stop Sales of All Tobacco Products

Posted on 02/5/2014 by | General News | Comments

Bulletin Today | Personal HealthBy Michael Felberbaum and Tom Murphy, AP Business Writers CVS, the nation’s second-largest drugstore chain, is kicking the habit of selling tobacco products as it continues to shift its focus toward being more of a health care provider. The company said Wednesday that it will phase out cigarettes, cigars and chewing tobacco by Oct. 1 in its 7,600 stores nationwide, in a move that it says will help it grow its business that works with doctors, hospitals and others to …

New Study Looks at Caregiving and Twins

Posted on 02/4/2014 by | Caregiving | Comments

Bulletin Today | CaregivingDoes caregiving cause stress? Most research shows that it does — in spades.  But a small study on a limited sample suggests how family caregivers handle distress is influenced more by their genes and family history than by the difficulty of the caregiving role. Those are the findings of Peter Vitaliano, a professor of psychiatry and psychology at the University of Washington, and his colleagues after studying more than a thousand female twins, some of whom were caregivers. According to Vitaliano, how your parents …

Cost Barriers Persist for Colonoscopy Screening In Medicare

Posted on 01/15/2014 by | AARP Blog Author | Comments

Personal Health | Public Policy InstituteThousands of people in the United States die every year from colorectal cancer—cancer of the colon or rectum. That’s astonishing because colorectal cancer is almost entirely preventable by use of recommended screening tests. Yet, in 2008, less than two-thirds of all people ages 65 and older had the screening. Medicare pays for several types of screening tests, including colonoscopy which is considered the best test for early detection and prevention of colorectal cancer. Colonoscopy allows for removal of polyps and …

Improving the Odds for 9 Million Uninsured Adults Ages 50-64

Posted on 01/8/2014 by | AARP Blog Author | Comments

Public Policy InstituteAmid all the criticism of healthcare.gov and Obamacare these days, it’s easy to forget that a key goal of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) is to help people get coverage. For people who are uninsured or underinsured, a major accident or illness is more than a health crisis; it’s a potential financial disaster. In 2012, 9 million people ages 50 through 64 were uninsured. For these individuals, the Affordable Care Act offers new opportunities for coverage and will help some …

Older Unemployed Face a Tough Road

Posted on 01/2/2014 by | AARP Blog Author | Comments

WorkWhat’s the prognosis for the older long-term unemployed? Grim. That’s the takeaway from “Set for Life,” a new American Public Television documentary underwritten by the AARP Foundation. The hour-long program tracks several primary breadwinners who have lost their jobs, the effect that has on their families and their efforts to land a new one. The program catalogs the dismantling of the American Dream – an informal compact that assured workers of relative job stability, health care, and the opportunity to …