New Rules on Workplace Wellness Programs Make Employees Pay for Privacy

You might soon be paying more for your insurance than some of your coworkers if you are unwilling to share your medical information with your employer, according to rules released May 16 by the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC). The new rules allow employers to charge employees a penalty equal to 30 percent of the total employer-employee cost of employee-only health insurance unless they divulge their health data to their employer’s workplace wellness program. Spouses can also be charged another …

AARP Opposes Employer Invasion of Medical Privacy

UPDATE (5/16/2016): AARP is deeply disappointed with the new EEOC rules on workplace wellness programs. Read our press release. ***** With election season in full force, much of the work inside Washington is flying under the radar. While Congress remains deeply divided, there continues to be action on the regulatory front. One such development should be a real attention grabber: a proposed Obama administration rule that would allow an employer’s workplace wellness program to require you and your family to …

Survey: Most Buyers on Insurance Exchanges Were Uninsured

By Julie Appleby, KHN Staff Writer, Kaiser Health News Nearly 6 in 10 Americans who bought insurance for this year through the health law’s online marketplaces were previously uninsured – most for at least two years, according to a new survey that looks at the experiences of those most affected by the law. That finding is higher than some earlier estimates and counters arguments made by critics of the law that most of those who purchased the new policies were previously insured. The survey also found that consumers …

The Takeaway: 1 In 4 Working-Age Americans Had No Health Insurance

Individual Insurance Market Too Costly for Most: More than a quarter of working-age U.S. adults””or about 48 million people””lacked health insurance at some point in 2011, according to a new study from the nonprofit Commonwealth Fund. The study polled people aged 19 to 64. Of those without insurance, 70 percent had spent a year or more without coverage, and 57 percent had been uninsured for two years or more.