Eat to Sleep: Which Foods Help Your Zzz’s?

Does what you eat affect how well you sleep? The answer appears to be yes, and we’re not just talking about midnight snacking. A new study from the University of Pennsylvania finds that a more varied diet – including five nutrients in particular – could improve people’s sleep. The research was published online in May in the journal Appetite. The researchers were interested in the diet-sleep link because too little sleep is linked to obesity, diabetes, heart disease and cognitive …

Eating Done Right: Cabbage-Food of the Week

After an afternoon swim at the local postage-stamp sized pool in Earlville, Iowa, my younger sister (age 7) and I (age 9) would return to our grandmother’s house ravenously hungry. Most of the time, Grandma served us a steaming bowl of cabbage, carrot and potato soup, made with three vegetables abundant in her garden. We devoured the soup, along with warm bread slathered in butter and glasses of cold milk. To this day, I credit my grandmother with teaching me …

Is 100 The New 50? Centenarians Advise Boomers

Those who have lived to be 100 have some advice for you young whipper-snappers in your 50s who want to reach the century mark: Sleep longer and eat a more healthful diet. That’s the finding from Unitedhealthcare’s annual “100@100 Survey,” which for the first time looked not only at the century-old group, but also at boomers age 50 to 55. As of 2010, the Census Bureau estimates there are 72,000 Americans who have lived 100 years or more. By 2050, …

Paleo: The Key to a Healthy Lifestyle?

This is a guest post by Annie Lynsen, on loan to AARP from Small Act. The Paleolithic Diet, or “Paleo” for short, is a dietary lifestyle that eschews processed foods, dairy and grains in favor of a vegetable-, fruit- and meat-based diet. The logic is that we should eat as our ancient ancestors did, because such a nutritional balance will allow our bodies to work the way they were designed to work. In the introduction to Everyday Paleo, Sarah Fragaso …

Another reason to get – and stay – active!

In the New York Times online today, there is a story on a recent study that found that strength training actually helps older women (aged 65-75) sharpen their minds – as well as their muscles! A win-win! The findings are particularly important, since older women are less likely to do strength training, one researcher said, and strength training can promote bone health. One other health note to take: it looks like reducing your sodium intake – even by a half …