This Week in Boomer History: ‘My Fair Lady’ … Jackie O

Notable events from our shared experience During the “Saturday Night Massacre” of Oct. 20, 1973, U.S. Attorney General Elliott Richardson (left) refuses President Richard Nixon’s order to fire special Watergate prosecutor Archibald Cox and resigns in protest. Deputy Attorney General William Ruckelshaus follows suit. Solicitor General Robert Bork, the third-ranking Justice Department official, carries out the order to remove Cox. Twenty-one resolutions calling for Nixon’s impeachment are introduced in Congress. >> Famous Latino Baby Boomers In the deadliest day for …

This Week in Boomer History: Che … ‘Cats’ … ‘SNL’

Bolivian soldiers execute Ernesto “Che” Guevara on Oct. 9, 1967, a day after capturing Fidel Castro’s collaborator in the Cuban revolution. In an attempt to win back territory lost during the Six-Day War of 1967, Egypt and Syria launch a coordinated surprise attack on Israel Oct. 6, 1973, during the Jewish holiday of Yom Kippur. The fighting ends in less than three weeks; five years later, Israel and Egypt normalize relations. Inspired by T.S. Eliot’s Old Possum’s Book of Practical …

This Week in Boomer History: Attica … Oprah … ‘Imagine’

Notable events from our shared experience Pete Rose breaks Ty Cobb’s record for most career hits with his 4,192nd on Sept. 11, 1985. In 1989, Rose, then manager of the Cincinnati Reds, is banned for life from baseball for betting on games — specifically his own team’s. Photographed by Andy Warhol for the cover, John Lennon releases his second solo album, Imagine, on Sept. 9. 1971. Former bandmate George Harrison plays guitar on four tracks. The cut “How Do You Sleep?” is seen …

Ruby and Maya Remind Us: The Arts Helped Blacks to Survive

What happens to a dream deferred? Does it dry up like a raisin in the sun? Or fester like a sore- And then run? Does it stink like rotten meat? Or crust and sugar over- like a syrupy sweet? Maybe it just sags like a heavy load. Or does it explode? That poem, among the most famous by Langston Hughes, was written in 1951. A prelude to the civil rights movement, it is among the quintessential examples of how arts …

This Week in Boomer History: Test Tube Baby … Kitchen Debate … ADA

Noteworthy events from our common experience President George H.W. Bush signs the Americans with Disabilities Act into law on July 26, 1990. Bob Dylan straps on his electric guitar and plugs in his amplifier at the Newport (R.I.) Folk Festival on July 25, 1965. The crowd boos (and cheers) him; purists are furious. >> Sign up for the AARP Health Newsletter  Born July 25, 1978, Louise Joy Brown is the world’s first “test tube baby,” though she’d more accurately be …

This Week in Boomer History: Miranda Warning … Live Aid … NYC Blackout

Notable events from our shared experience Gloria Steinem delivers an “Address to the Women of America,” considered by many one of the century’s great speeches, on July 10, 1971. In it, she says: “Sex and race, because they are easy, visible differences, have been the primary ways of organizing human beings into superior and inferior groups, and into the cheap labor on which this system still depends. We are talking about a society in which there will be no roles …