history

Saved by the Arts

Posted on 07/23/2014 by |Vice President, Multicultural Markets | Comments

Your LifeWhat happens to a dream deferred? Does it dry up like a raisin in the sun? Or fester like a sore— And then run? Does it stink like rotten meat? Or crust and sugar over— like a syrupy sweet? Maybe it just sags like a heavy load. Or does it explode? That poem, among the most famous by Langston Hughes, was written in 1951. A prelude to the civil rights movement, it is among the quintessential examples of how arts …

This Week in Boomer History: Test Tube Baby … Kitchen Debate … ADA

Posted on 07/20/2014 by |News, Culture, Sights and Sounds | Comments

PoliticsNoteworthy events from our common experience President George H.W. Bush signs the Americans with Disabilities Act into law on July 26, 1990. Bob Dylan straps on his electric guitar and plugs in his amplifier at the Newport (R.I.) Folk Festival on July 25, 1965. The crowd boos (and cheers) him; purists are furious. >> Sign up for the AARP Health Newsletter  Born July 25, 1978, Louise Joy Brown is the world’s first “test tube baby,” though she’d more accurately be …

This Week in Boomer History: Miranda Warning … Live Aid … NYC Blackout

Posted on 07/6/2014 by |News, Culture, Sights and Sounds | Comments

PoliticsNotable events from our shared experience Gloria Steinem delivers an “Address to the Women of America,” considered by many one of the century’s great speeches, on July 10, 1971. In it, she says: “Sex and race, because they are easy, visible differences, have been the primary ways of organizing human beings into superior and inferior groups, and into the cheap labor on which this system still depends. We are talking about a society in which there will be no roles …

This Week in Boomer History: Earth Day … New Coke … ‘Heartbreak Hotel’

Posted on 04/20/2014 by |News, Culture, Sights and Sounds | Comments

Bulletin TodayNotable events from our shared experience Polaroid Corp. introduces its SX-70 folding camera on April 25, 1972. It’s the first automatic, motorized, single-lens reflex camera that makes self-developing instant color prints. The 1964 New York World’s Fair opens April 22 with the theme “Peace Through Understanding” and provides an early Space Age look into the future. On April 24, 1980, President Jimmy Carter launches Operation Eagle Claw to free Americans held captive at the U.S. Embassy in Tehran. Eight servicemen die in the failed …

This Week in Boomer History: Peace Corps … Concorde … Greatest!

Posted on 02/23/2014 by |News, Culture, Sights and Sounds | Comments

Bulletin TodayNoteworthy events from our shared experience Cassius Clay (later Muhammad Ali) becomes heavyweight champion of the world on Feb. 25, 1964, when Sonny Liston doesn’t answer the bell for the seventh round. “Incredibly, the loud-mouthed, bragging, insulting youngster had been telling the truth all along,” writes Robert Lipsyte in the New York Times. Steve Jobs is born Feb. 24, 1955. In 1976 he starts Apple Computer with Steve Wozniak and Ron Wayne, who sells his shares for $800 the same year. …

This Week in Boomer History: January 20 — 26

Posted on 01/19/2014 by |News, Culture, Sights and Sounds | Comments

Bulletin TodayNoteworthy facts from our shared experience: 1. Jan. 20, 1981 — 444 days after Iranian students overran the U.S. embassy in Tehran, 52 American hostages are released. Ted Koppel’s Nightline, born as The Iran Crisis — America Held Hostage: Day XXX, seeks fresh material. 2. Back to the future! The first gull-wing DeLorean sports car rolls off the assembly line on Jan. 21, 1981. 3. The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame inducts its first members this week in 1986, including Chuck …