AIDS Activist Mary Fisher’s Newest Good Deed

Who knew that counting beads could help change the world? Mary Fisher had a notion it would. The AIDS activist and author immediately saw the power of connecting beads to good deeds after meeting a filmmaker who told her about a game he played with his children to track their anonymous acts of kindness. “I was fascinated by this,” says Fisher, 65, from her home in Sedona, Ariz. “The minute he said beads I thought I had to do a …

Vivian Davis, the Oldest Active Peace Corps Volunteer, Raises HIV/AIDS Awareness

Whenever Vivian Davis feels like doing something, she does it. So when she felt like joining the Peace Corps, she did – at age 78. Now 80, Davis is the Peace Corps’ oldest active volunteer. But not for long. She’s winding up a two-year assignment in Vaalbank, South Africa, a small, rural village 50 miles north of Pretoria. Davis has helped to raise HIV/AIDS awareness – distributing condoms, holding meetings about mother-to-child transmission of the virus, organizing data systems and …

On the Road to the Skoll World Forum

 The following is a post from Kim Sedmak, Executive Producer of “Life Reimagined TODAY” with Jane Pauley on NBC’s TODAY show. As I prepare to depart for the Skoll World Forum in Oxford, England next week, I’m enamored with this year’s theme – “Dare to Imagine!” This is especially fitting, since I’m happily driven as the producer of Jane Pauley’s NBC TODAY show segment, “Life Reimagined” to identify stories featuring those who are succeeding at daring to reimagine their lives at 50+. There …

Jerome Horwitz: 5 Surprising Facts About the Inventor of AZT

It wasn’t that long ago – 1987, to be precise – that U.S. Surgeon General Everett Koop predicted the HIV/AIDS epidemic would kill 100 million people by the year 2000. That didn’t happen. Instead, about 34 million people are living with HIV, according to AVERT, an international health organization, and a 2006 study published in the British medical journal QJM found that patients who are diagnosed as HIV-positive before developing full-blown AIDS now have an average life expectancy of 21.5 years. …

The Takeaway: AIDS Memorial Quilt On Display in Washington, D.C.

In 1987, the AIDS Memorial Quilt was started to memorialize Americans who died of AIDS. Portions of the quilt’s now 48,000 panels–hand sewn by family and friends of those lost to the disease-will be displayed throughout Washington, D.C. during the month of July.

AIDS: 30 Years Later

30 years ago, four letters equaled a death sentence. AIDS was shrouded in mystery. Was it contagious by breathing the same air as an infected person? By touching them? Kissing them? In years since, research of HIV/AIDS has made the disease a more livable condition. This month, AARP Magazine highlights the lives of six 50+ HIV-positive Americans living and thriving. But that doesn’t mean researchers should stop the march to find a true cure. Some of the striking statistics shared …