Top Scams of 2016

Chalk up 2016 as another year of role-playing rip-offs: Fake IRS agents threatening arrest or deportation unless immediate payment is made for supposed back taxes. Fake grandchildren claiming trouble while overseas and in need of their loved ones’ financial help. Fake warnings of dire consequences for supposedly missing jury duty, avoided only by paying a fine and providing personal information for likely identity theft. Continuing a three-year trend, the IRS impostor scam was again the ruse most reported in 2016 …

Scariest Scams: Just Tricks, No Treats

Half-pint Halloweeners may trigger some good-natured fright, but what’s really scary? These horrifying (and holiday-appropriate) scams, which are still going strong. Identity Theft of the Dead Each year the identities of millions of deceased Americans are used to fraudulently open credit card accounts, apply for loans and get cellphone or other services. Identity thieves glean personal information from obituaries, social media, accomplices working at hospitals and nursing homes, or websites that publish death certificates (sometimes including Social Security numbers). It …

Latest Spin on the Infamous IRS Impostor Scam

From the start, this was no typical scam. Unlike previous IRS impostors, the fraudsters behind these phone calls weren’t just randomly trolling for personal information for identity theft. These crooks already had some of it, including the last four digits of the Social Security numbers of those they called. That data, along the display of an IRS toll-free number on recipients’ caller ID, made their demands for money more convincing — and frightening. Pay those back taxes immediately, they warned, or …