Wendy Williams and Others Are Fabulous at 50+!

Thank You, Grandma, for Human Nature

By Alison Gopnik Why do I exist? This isn’t a philosophical cri de coeur; it’s an evolutionary riddle. At 58 I’m well past menopause, yet I’ll soldier, on, with luck, for many years more. The riddle grows more vivid when you realize that human beings (and killer whales) are the only species where females outlive their fertility. Our closest primate relatives – chimpanzees, for example – usually die before their 50s, when they are still fertile. This isn’t just a …

Not Everyone Is Living Longer

When it is unveiled in the coming weeks, the Social Security Trustees report will no doubt prompt the program’s critics to call for change, as it does each year. And one of their suggestions will likely be to raise the age of eligibility for Social Security and Medicare benefits. It sounds so reasonable. Isn’t everybody living longer? Unfortunately, the answer is no. >> Sign up for the AARP Advocacy Newsletter The truth is that gains in life expectancy are not …

Is Your State a … Weakling?

Politico Magazine has tallied the numbers, and the Oscar for best state goes to … New Hampshire. Actually, the magazine’s ranking is pegged to a different winter event: the president’s annual State of the Union address. Here’s what Politico‘s Margaret Slattery has to say: Tuesday, President Obama, if precedent holds, will declare that the state of America’s union is “strong.” Is it? One way to judge is by the state of the states of the union: How strong are they, and, …

Does Caregiving Help You Live Longer?

If you’ve heard that being a family caregiver can diminish your life expectancy, the results of a new report from Johns Hopkins University should make you relax. It turns out that caring for a chronically ill or disabled family member can, in fact, extend a caregiver’s life. Sign up for the AARP Health Newsletter The recent research showed that caregivers live an average of nine months longer than non-caregivers. Researchers took participants from a pool of 30,000 in a National Institutes of Health …

Who Wants to Live to 120? Hardly Anyone

If a new medical treatment could slow aging and allow you to live to 120, would you want to? Most Americans would say, “No thanks,” according to a new survey by the Pew Research Center. The researchers wanted to know Americans’ views on aging – after all, one in five will be age 65 by 2050 – as well as the recent push for medical research and advances to extend our life expectancy. Turns out, we’re not so thrilled about …