3 Challenges for Long-Term Care in America

Right now, at kitchen tables across America, real families are confronting the same question:  how will we care for mom or dad, or another loved one, if something happens and they can’t care for themselves without assistance?  And if and when the time comes, who will care for us? Following the Federal Commission on Long-Term Care‘s recently released report, AARP and The Hill Newspaper convened three of the Commissioners and other experts to discuss ways to improve long-term services and …

2013 World Alzheimer Report Released

More than 35 million people worldwide have Alzheimer’s, with the number projected to double by 2030 and triple to 115 million by 2050.That’s why experts from around the globe are working together for better Alzheimer’s care and support for families. Their collective effort is evident in a report released today by Alzheimer’s Disease International, a group  of 79 Alzheimer’s associations. The annual report makes policy recommendations. Here are the highlights: Countries must develop National Dementia Plans to structure and fund …

What Are We Willing-and Not Willing-to Do for Mom and Dad?

How do we view our role in taking care of our parents? Are we willing to help them out financially? What about having them move in with us? And, what are our expectations for our own children when we need help? These intriguing questions are addressed in a just-released national, online study. This past June, MORE magazine surveyed 751 adults age 18+ with at least one living parent or guardian. The full story with results will be published online in the coming …

Recommendations of Long-Term Care Commission Show Progress

The federal Commission on Long-Term Care voted Sept. 12 on its final recommendations, which will be included in the commission’s final report later this month. AARP is encouraged by the examination of the serious, policy-focused bipartisan recommendations to address our country’s long-term services and supports crisis, which affects millions of people, including older Americans, people with disabilities and their family caregivers. While the recommendations are far from perfect, they show progress in seeking solutions to this crisis. Importantly, we are …

Medicare Does Not Pay for Long-Term Care

Many consumers and policymakers mistakenly believe that Medicare – the federal health insurance program for people age 65 and older and some younger people with disabilities – pays for long-term care. It does not, as stated in the official Medicare handbook. Millions of Medicare enrollees must pay for long-term care services (such as personal assistance at home, assisted living, and nursing home care) entirely from their own income and savings. Confusion often stems from misinterpretation of coverage provided by Medicare’s …

Home- and Community-Based Services: The Right Place and the Right Time

As evidenced at a recent hearing of the federal Commission on Long-Term Care, broad support is building: It’s time to end Medicaid’s “institutional bias.” It’s not rational that Medicaid entitles eligible individuals to be placed in nursing homes, while limiting their ability to receive services at home. On average, the Medicaid program can serve about three older people or adults with physical disabilities with home- and community-based services (HCBS) for the cost of putting one in a nursing home. Moreover, …