Study: Some Expired Drugs Could Be Effective (But Don’t Try This at Home)

A study published yesterday in the Archives of Internal Medicine shows many prescription drugs could have a longer shelf life than assumed, in some cases much longer. But while the results could have important implications for drug companies, researchers are quick to caution consumers against applying the findings to their own medicine cabinets.

5 Things to Talk About With Your Doctor

The following is a guest post from William J. Hall, MD, AARP Board Member. Bill Hall is a geriatrician with a special interest in strategies for successful aging. Last time, I described some of the reasons why both patients and physicians sometimes feel that the office visit is not as satisfying as either would like. Based on many years of caring for older adults, here are a few simple strategies: Make a List. No matter what your age, the most …

More Grandkids Poisoned by Grandparents’ Medicine

Accidental poisonings from medicine cause more emergency room visits for young children each year than do car accidents, and one big reason may be that grandparents often store their prescription drugs in places easy for their grandkids to reach, says a new national poll. The University of Michigan Mott Children’s Hospital recently polled parents and grandparents of children ages 1 to 5 about the presence of prescription meds in their homes and how the drugs were stored. The poll found …

The Takeaway: Hospitals Open Seniors-Only Emergency Rooms

Emergency Rooms of Their Own: A growing number of American hospitals have been debuting emergency rooms designed specifically for older adults, generally those 65 and up. Special accommodations include things like nonskid floors, rails along the walls, extra heating units, thicker mattresses to reduce bedsores and artificial skylights intended to combat “sundowning.”

Pill Popper

I admit it; I pop pills on a daily basis. I won’t bore you with what I have to take when, but suffice it to say, several years ago, pill popping became a part of my everyday existence. I wasn’t excited about it. It’s one thing to take meds when you’re ill, for a period of time (Z-packs! Revolutionary! Sayonara, sinusitis, in 5 short days!). But something in me chafes against a regular, daily, dose of anything medicinal. In fact, …

Taking an Excursion for Your Medical Needs?

Doesn’t seem to make sense, but it’s actually becoming more and more common. While medical tourism has existing for some time — where Americans will travel abroad to other countries to get necessary medical treatment for cheaper — a new trend is growing in the U.S.: Domestic medical travel. Via AARP Bulletin: [A]s medical travel firms negotiate attractive rates with doctors, clinics and hospitals and market them to insurance companies, employer-funded health plans and individuals. While hospitals don’t like to …