The Best Sunscreens You’re Not Using

Who’s better at using sunscreen lotion, men or women? Truthfully, they’re both pretty lousy at it, according to a new government study. Even sadder: New testing of sunscreen lotions finds you can’t always believe the claims on the label. A Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) study found a paltry 14 percent of men and 30 percent of women reported that they regularly use sunscreen on both their face and other exposed skin. Women are better when it comes …

¿Le eres infiel… a tu protector solar?

In English | Las mujeres —incluso las mujeres inteligentes como tú y yo— hacen trampa cuando de protector solar se trata. Solo el 40.3% de las mujeres de 55 a 64 años usan protector solar con regularidad en la cara y otras partes expuestas, según un estudio de los CDC (Centros para el Control y la Prevención de Enfermedades) publicado en el Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology el 19 de mayo. Fotos: 10 consejos para cuidar tu piel …

The Sun-Protection Mistake We’re Still Making

Here’s a scary new fact to get you in gear: More than 10 percent of skin cancers occur on the eyelids. According to the Skin Cancer Foundation, these tumors can grow deep beneath the skin (think icebergs waiting to surface) and increase the rapid growth of other skin cancers on your face. By now, of course, you know that wearing a broad-spectrum SPF 30+ sunscreen every day (regardless of weather or location) is a must. (“SPF” stands for “sun-protection factor,” …

7 Ways to Be a Skin Cancer Warrior

By age 50 most women have experienced some form of sun damage – and many have been through the ordeal of skin cancer. That’s why L’Oreal Paris and the Melanoma Research Alliance have teamed up to launch the It’s THAT Worth It Thunderclap online initiative (itsthatworthit.org). For each person who signs up on the site by 5 p.m. ET on May 20 and shares melanoma prevention information with friends, L’Oreal Paris will make a $1 donation to melanoma research. For …

Aspirin May Lower Risk of Skin Cancer in Women

Older women who took aspirin at least twice a week had a lower risk of developing melanoma, a deadly form of skin cancer, a new study finds. The study, published in the journal Cancer, looked at melanoma in about 60,000 Caucasian women ages 50 to 79, reported National Public Radio (NPR). (Researchers focused on light-skinned people because they’re at the highest risk for this type of cancer.) Over a 12-year period – and after controlling for risk factors like tanning and …