memoirs

Stories to Share: Helping Seniors Write About Their Lives

Posted on 10/23/2013 by | Volunteering | Comments

Your LifeThere was one about a blind date. There was another about keeping kosher, but sneaking BLTs. And then there was one about our family’s store surviving the Great Depression thanks to help from a friend. Sign up for the AARP Health Newsletter Pop Pop used to love telling stories. He was 96 when he passed away last fall, which gave us almost 30 years together. That’s a lot of time to talk—and a lot of time to listen. I feel …

All Hail The Queen of Irreverence!

Posted on 06/20/2013 by | AARP Blog Author | Comments

Entertainment“Most people think I’m a hard-drinking slut, but really I’m an angel of mercy.” That’s journalist Marion Winik talking about her new book, Highs in the Low 50s: How I Stumbled through the Joys of Single Living. I’ll understand completely if you expect it to contain all manner of lewd behavior. But having written previously about everything from her drug use in early adulthood to her first husband’s death from AIDs complications in 1994, Winik seems to have Toned Things Down …

Now Read This!: March Memoir Madness

Posted on 03/12/2013 by | AARP Blog Author | Comments

EntertainmentMemoirs are tricky. The best of them, like Jeannette Walls’s The Glass Castle, are brutally honest stories that have you laughing at a feckless father’s shenanigans in one moment and crying over a callous mother’s dismissal of her daughter in the next. The worst are what I call “stunt memoirs” — gimmicky accounts of quixotic adventures the author never would have undertaken without a publisher’s advance in hand. You can tell you’ve come across a stunt memoir by examining its …

Write your life.

Posted on 07/12/2010 by | Archived Contributor | Comments

Your LifeCheck out these tips from AARP on how to write about your life story, whether it be a memoir, personal essay, or something entirely different. This simple advice can send you on your way to a beautiful piece to share with your loved ones, or a best-selling book to share with the world! Here’s one: Start with gripping. Best-selling author Elizabeth Gilbert didn’t begin Eat, Pray, Love with the prosaic sentence “I was born in Waterbury, Connecticut.” Her first chapter …