memory

She Was His North Star

Posted on 04/1/2014 by | Aging, Home & Family Expert | Comments

CaregivingHis shoulders slump and his head bows as if his very life force has been suddenly drawn out of him. His face reflects the pain and confusion that his mind and heart are toiling with, struggling to grasp a wisp of reality and understand that the impossible has indeed happened. “I just can’t believe it; I can’t fathom it,” he says. “Are you telling me the truth? She’s not available anymore?” This happens every time my dad asks about my …

Should You Be Screened for Dementia?

Posted on 03/25/2014 by | AARP Blog Author | Comments

Brain Health | Bulletin TodayShould older adults be routinely screened for Alzheimer’s disease or memory problems? Maybe, maybe not. A government panel says there’s not yet enough data to recommend either for or against it. The panel’s uncertainty reflects the complexity of the issue at a time when scientists are progressing much faster in their ability to diagnose Alzheimer’s than in their ability to treat it. This news is especially relevant in light of the recent discovery of a blood test that can predict with 90 …

Special Report Explores Caregiving in America

Posted on 03/12/2014 by | Aging, Home & Family Expert | Comments

CaregivingI have been very public about caregiving for my parents over the past several years, but I know that the majority of the 42 million family caregivers in the U.S. aren’t as vocal as I have been about the challenges we face. Thanks to a recent special report in the Washington Post, this “quiet force caring for an aging America,” as it is described, is getting national media attention. Perhaps our voices will not be so quiet as more Americans become …

Simple test for Alzheimer’s? Get Out Pen and Paper

Posted on 01/22/2014 by | Personal Health and Well-being | Comments

Brain Health | Bulletin TodayCould a 15-minute test you take with pen and paper provide an early warning of Alzheimer’s or other cognitive problems? Researchers at the Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center say the simple 22-question test, called the Self-Administered Gerocognitive Examination, or SAGE, can’t diagnose Alzheimer’s, but it can reveal cognitive impairments at an early, more treatable stage. (To take the test, click here to download.) These impairments “could be related to many conditions like medications, ministrokes, dementia or sleep apnea to …

11 Things We Didn’t Know Last Week

Posted on 01/15/2014 by | News, Culture, Sights and Sounds | Comments

11 Things | Bulletin Today News, discoveries and fun … 1. A novelist/farmer gives “chick lit” a whole new meaning. (Learn more at CBS) (hat tip to Hilarie Grey) 2. It’s possible to score a night at the Waldorf-Astoria for $15.75. (Learn more at AARP) 3. New surgical superglue can patch a hole in a beating heart. (Learn more at NPR) 4. Some people who get migraines spell relief p-l-a-c-e-b-o. (Learn more at AARP) 5. The NBA will end merger payments to the owners of a defunct ABA team – at $800 million. (Learn …

Vitamin E May Slow Alzheimer’s Progression

Posted on 01/3/2014 by | AARP Blog Author | Comments

Brain Health | Bulletin TodayWe haven’t discovered a cure for Alzheimer’s, or a drug that reverses the ravages of the disease, but researchers may have found a treatment to slow disease progression that’s simple, cheap and safe. Among more than 600 patients with mild to moderate Alzheimer’s disease, a daily high dose of vitamin E slowed the decline in the ability of patients to perform everyday tasks, such as dress or bathe independently, by about six months on average. And, perhaps more tellingly, those taking …