Mac Attack (and More): The Latest in the Tech Support Scam

For six years, telephones have been ringing off the hook with alarming but bogus news: There’s a dangerous virus on your computer, and the caller – a self-described technician with Microsoft, “Windows” or an antivirus software company – says he can remove it … for a price. But now, it’s not just PC users at risk for the notorious tech support scam. Mac users (and the machines themselves) are also vulnerable – and this time, fix-it fraudsters don’t even have …

The 411 on Two-Factor Authentication

In an era in which online accounts can be cracked with sophisticated software or a hacker’s ingenuity, taking an extra step when you log in can give you miles in added protection — even when using “strong” passwords. It’s called two-factor authentication (2FA), and it requires both something you know (like a password) and something you have (like a cellphone). Once enacted, after you successfully log in to an online account, you receive a code to your phone, via text …

Bye-Bye Windows XP: What You Need to Know

Planned obsolescence. You expect it with your cellphone and your TV. You’re used to it with your car. But your computer operating system – the software that determines what you see on the screen and how you make the hardware work –  has nearly always allowed you to upgrade and stay connected and productive. Now, if you’re among the hundreds of millions of computer users running Windows XP, it’s the end of the road. After April 8, Microsoft is cutting …

Meet the iPad Air … and Its Competition

Everybody knew that Apple would announce its new, lighter, slimmer, faster iPads on Oct. 22. Only the change in name came as a surprise. Welcome the iPad Air. Whether the faster processor, faster graphics, better cameras and sound, improved software, and slimmer-than-ever appearance mean you need this thing is, of course, up to you. Apple makes the case that 475,000 apps give the iPad an unbeatable advantage. Sign up for the AARP Money Matters newsletter And, if the 1-pound, 7.5-mm …

WebTV: The Internet Revolution That Wasn’t

  Back in the mid-1990s, when PCs cost thousands of dollars and required a fair amount of technological savvy to set up and operate, WebTV seemed like the next big thing: an easier, cheaper ($300) way to get online and experience the still-newfangled wonders of the World Wide Web. “After spending a couple of weeks using WebTV,” BusinessWeek technology columnist Stephen H. Wildstrom gushed in 1996, “I think we may now have the product that could turn the World Wide Web …