Choosing Home for Someone Else

I am my husband’s guardian. I was appointed by the Vermont probate court after a court hearing over 13 years ago. He had suffered a severe stroke, was disabled and could no longer manage his affairs. Although he had lost his speech, he developed his own sign language and could make his wishes known, at least to those of us who were close to him. And he clearly wanted to go home, and to make sure, he celebrated leaving the …

Why Spending More For Meals on Wheels Would Cost Almost Nothing

By David Orenstein Expanding programs like Meals on Wheels would save 26 of 48 U.S. states money and would allow more seniors to stay in their own homes, research shows. A new study reports that if every state in the lower 48 expanded the number of seniors receiving meals by just 1 percent, 1,722 more Medicaid recipients could avoid living in a nursing home and most states would experience a net annual savings from implementing the expansion. Pennsylvania would see …

A Green House? Meet the New Nursing Home

When it comes to caring for a loved one, the Rolling Stones nailed it: You can’t always get what you want. You may want Mom, Dad or a spouse to be able to stay home, but it isn’t always possible. They may need a nursing home. What you, hopefully, can do is to control what kind of place it will be. That is why I’m mentioning Green House homes. They are a different kind of nursing home you should know …

Sex, Alzheimer’s and Boomers: Trouble for Nursing Homes

Romance – for many, it’s one of life’s great pleasures. But for those living in a nursing home sex can get a bit more complicated. Having Alzheimer’s disease or some other form of dementia calls into question whether the individuals involved have the ability to give legal consent. Nursing homes regularly struggle to make that call, and this problem will only grow worse as the number of older Americans grows as the the boomer generation joins their ranks. Related: Sex and …

Was My Mom Abused?

On July 2, USA Today reported that more than 20 former employees of a Georgia Alzheimer’s care center are facing dozens of criminal charges after a three-month state investigation uncovered allegations of cruel treatments of patients. The cruelty ranged from physical abuse – slapping patients and throwing water on them – to outright neglect and financial exploitation. Other abuse included shackling patients to their beds with sheets and ‘double diapering’ so the staff wouldn’t have to change soiled diapers so often. As it …