Has the Hourglass Figure Run Out of Time?

Ladies, are we going from zaftig to zeppelin? According to a recent study published in the Journal of the American Medical Association, the waist size of the average American woman grew almost two inches — from just over 36 to nearly 38 — from 1999 to 2012. Making the trend especially curious, the study authors noted, is the fact that abdominal obesity — which jumped from 46.4 percent of the population in 1999 to 54.2 percent in 2012 — keeps getting …

People Located Near Bike Lanes and Walking Paths Exercise More (A Lot More)

Post by Shyidah Sala’huddin, AARP: Not exercising isn’t completely your fault. A study conducted in the United Kingdom by the University of Cambridge MRC Epidemiology Unit (and published in July by the American Journal of Public Health) finds that people who live near bike lanes and walking paths are likely to exercise at least 40 minutes more a week than people who don’t have easy access to such traffic-free routes. In fact, for every 0.6 miles a person resides near …

Could You Give Up Sugar for 10 Days?

Television host Katie Couric, whose new documentary, “Fed Up,” blames sugar for the country’s spiraling obesity problem, is challenging people to take a 10-day break from the sweet stuff. In an interview on ABC’s “Good Morning America,” Couric urged people to try and give up foods with added sugar, including artificial sweeteners, “which have the same impact on your brain as added sugar.” That means foods with naturally occurring sugar, including fresh fruit and plain yogurt, are fine, but options …

Counting Calories, Not Eating Frequent Meals, Helps Dieters

It’s familiar advice to dieters: Eat five small meals a day, instead of two big ones, and you’ll stave off hunger and lose more weight. Except that it may not work that way. According to a new British study, the total number of calories, not meal frequency, is what counts. Women who ate two big meals a day burned the same amount of calories as women who ate five small meals. In other words, it’s the total amount of calories …

7 Ways to Fight Your Sugar Addiction

For those of us with a sweet tooth – which appears to be most of the country – the newest research carries some bitter news: Americans eat way too much sugar, and it’s killing us. In one of the biggest studies to examine the issue, researchers from the government and two universities found a link between high sugar consumption and fatal heart disease. The study was published February 3 in JAMA Internal Medicine. The culprit, they believe, is all the sugar …

Why the Risk of Dementia May Be Declining

Exercise. Keep learning. Avoid obesity, diabetes and heart disease. Treat depression and cardiovascular risk factors such as high blood pressure and cholesterol. Stay socially active. Retire later. Have an educated mother. That prescription may prevent or postpone dementia, according to an analysis, just published in the New England Journal of Medicine, of five studies from 2005 to 2013. Experts on aging have found that the risk of dementia for individuals seems to have gone down over the last 20 years, and …