Health Among Top Issues That Matter Most to African Americans

In January 2011, AARP interviewed Americans 50 and older from every state, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands. We asked about their dreams as they think about what is next in their life as well as the challenges they see themselves facing. Staying healthy tops the list for African American/Black respondents in the Voices of the 50+ America: Dreams & Challenges study, with staying mentally sharp, having adequate health insurance coverage, and receiving Medicare benefits very …

Live Healthy and Be a Blessing to Your Heart

Michael Clarke Duncan was full of life just three years ago. The then-54-year-old actor was at the pinnacle of his career. His Academy Award-nominated performance as John Coffey in The Green Mile is still revered. Then, tragedy struck. Duncan suffered a heart attack on July 13, 2012. Despite the heroic efforts by his fiancée, reality TV star and minister Omarosa Manigault, who initially saved his life, he never fully recovered and died two months later. During February, American Heart Month, the life …

Food Labeling Requirements Could Make Older Americans Rethink Dining Out

It’s no secret that older Americans’ waistlines are expanding. From 2004 to 2013, the proportion of adults ages 50 and older who were obese increased 21 percent, from 25 to 31 percent of the population*. Associated with chronic diseases like heart disease and diabetes, rising levels of obesity are taking a toll on individual health and quality of life, as well as health care costs. Among all age groups, obesity accounts for approximately 21 percent of all health spending. One contributor to …

Midlife Diabetes Tied to Memory Problems Later in Life

Having diabetes or prediabetes in midlife is linked to memory problems later in life, according to new research published in Annals of Internal Medicine. In fact, diabetes appears to age the brain about five years faster than normal aging. Johns Hopkins researchers in Baltimore tracked the blood sugar levels and brain health of more than 15,000 adults ages 48 to 67 with regular exams for 20 years and found there was nearly 20 percent greater decline in memory and cognitive function in those with …

Has the Hourglass Figure Run Out of Time?

Ladies, are we going from zaftig to zeppelin? According to a recent study published in the Journal of the American Medical Association, the waist size of the average American woman grew almost two inches — from just over 36 to nearly 38 — from 1999 to 2012. Making the trend especially curious, the study authors noted, is the fact that abdominal obesity — which jumped from 46.4 percent of the population in 1999 to 54.2 percent in 2012 — keeps getting …

People Located Near Bike Lanes and Walking Paths Exercise More (A Lot More)

Not exercising isn’t completely your fault. A study conducted in the United Kingdom by the University of Cambridge MRC Epidemiology Unit (and published in July by the American Journal of Public Health) finds that people who live near bike lanes and walking paths are likely to exercise at least 40 minutes more a week than people who don’t have easy access to such traffic-free routes. In fact, for every 0.6 miles a person resides near a dedicated walking path or …