The New Older Workers: Women

The U.S. workforce has been turned on its (graying) head. New research finds that workers at or near retirement age are taking up a bigger share of the labor pool – a trend that’s driven mainly by women. And in this ever-evolving jobs landscape, older men and women are projected to be working more in the next decade. Using the latest Census Bureau data, the Washington-based Employee Benefit Research Institute looked at workers’ labor force participation rates over the last four …

Improving Economy? Not for the Long-Term Unemployed

What’s the outlook for people out of work for at least six months? Longer unemployment. Three Princeton University economists examined the status of people who reported they were unemployed for 27 weeks or more between 2008 and 2012 - and then revisited them 15 months later. Only 11 percent had found steady full-time work one year later while 30 percent were still looking. As many as 35 percent had dropped out of the labor force altogether. Another 24 percent were in …

Is It a Good Time to Find Work? Most Say No

How do Americans view today’s job market? Apparently not favorably. In a Gallup poll of 1,048 adults in March, more than two-thirds (68 percent) said now is not a good time to find a quality job. Only about 1 in 4 (28 percent) were positive about the odds of landing a position, the highest measure since the start of the economic downturn in January 2008. >> Sign up for the AARP Money newsletter Older workers were even more pessimistic. Among those …

Senate Deal on Jobless Benefits Won’t Bring Fast Relief for Unemployed

One of the hurdles blocking the extension of unemployment insurance benefits for about 2 million long-term unemployed workers has been eliminated. A small group of Republicans and Democrats in the Senate on March 13 reached an agreement that would extend benefits for another five months – gathering enough support to prevent a filibuster by opponents. The extension would be retroactive to Dec. 28, 2013, when benefits expired. Legislators who have been against extending benefits cite the cost, which runs about …

Where Are All the Workers Going?

No doubt about it: Americans are pushing back retirement, either because they can’t afford to quit working or they don’t care to do so. For some, it is a bit of both. Labor force participation rates have been rising at older ages, even among people in their 70s, and they are projected to continue increasing. This is good news for workers, giving them more time to save for retirement and fewer retirement years to finance. It’s also good for employers …

Pushed Out of the Workplace

Have you ever felt like an employer was holding your age against you? If so, you aren’t alone. In these tough economic times, more and more Americans believe they are facing age-based discrimination at the office. In fact, a 2013 AARP study found that nearly 2 in 3 workers ages 45-74 said they have seen or experienced age discrimination in the workplace. Of those, a whopping 92 percent said it was very or somewhat common. Nearly 20 percent of the …