States Step Up for Retirement Security

Are you saving (enough) for retirement? The numbers paint a worrisome picture – for Americans, our families and the nation. Three-quarters of Americans age 55-64 had less than $30,000 in their retirement accounts as of 2010. And, more than 70 million American workers do not have any type of employer-sponsored retirement plan. Clearly, we need some help to get on the road to retirement savings – and more effective ways to save money for our future. This is where the …

Women Face Tough Challenges in Retirement … But Can Overcome Them!

The writer Oscar Wilde said “When I was young I thought that money was the most important thing in life; now that I am old I know that it is.” This is a great insight into how vital money can be at older ages – when we have a much more difficult time earning money or just can no longer work. A recent report from AARP’s Public Policy Institute, An Uphill Climb: Women Face Greater Obstacles to Retirement Security, highlights …

GM Retirees Must Decide Today On Lump Sum Payout

After presumably agonizing for weeks over whether to keep their lifetime pension benefit or take a one-time lump-sum payment, some 42,000 General Motors retirees are faced with making that critical decision today. And there is no turning back. No do-overs. GM set Friday as the deadline when it offered its former employees and surviving spouses the choice to retain their monthly pension, which will be switched to an annuity provided by Prudential Insurance, or receive the lump-sum equivalent in one …

The Takeaway: 10 States With Biggest Pension Gaps; Is Yours On the List?

Economists say state retirement systems should have enough in assets to cover at least 80 percent of the pension money they owe retirees, but few states meet the 80 percent requirement–and some fall far shorter. A new report from the Pew Center on the States looks at the 10 states with the biggest pension gaps as of 2010:

The Takeaway: Retirement Ages Must Rise Worldwide

Retirement ages must rise globally if everyone’s gonna keep living longer and we don’t want to bankrupt national pension systems, says a new international report from the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development, an international organization with 34 member countries. Already, 67 is becoming the new 65, it says.

The Takeaway: Older Americans Feel Better About Their Money

So much of the financial news about older Americans is downbeat. More of them are falling into poverty.  A disproportionate number of older workers lost jobs in April. Will they get new ones? Don’t hold your breath. At last, welcome news: a Gallup survey finds that Americans ages 75 and older are the most likely (72 percent) of all age groups to say they feel good about the amount of money they have. Not only that, they’re the most likely …