Will There Be a Santa Claus Market Rally?

Since 1950, December has proven to be the best month for the stock market. According to MoneyChimp.com, the S&P 500 has turned in an average gain for December of 1.62 percent, outpacing any other month. So far this December, Santa has left nothing but coal in the stock market’s stocking, with the S&P 500 losing more than 65 points, or about 3.77 percent, through Dec. 15. Not exactly anyone’s idea of a rally. >> 5 Bad Investment Moves No need …

Should You Sell When Your Fund Manager Quits?

So, the star manager of your mutual fund leaves. Should you bail, too? It’s a question on many investors’ minds now after famed bond manager Bill Gross announced Friday he was leaving the company he founded, Pacific Investment Management Co., to start another fund at rival Janus. The Wall Street Journal reported today that investors so far have pulled $10 billion out of Pimco —  and $90 billion more may follow. “You have to be careful not to have a knee-jerk …

Add Adjusting Your 401(k) to End-of-Summer Plans

Now that we’re past the midyear of 2014, it’s a great time to review your retirement savings plan to make sure you’re on track. If you’re not contributing enough or haven’t rebalanced your portfolio since George W. Bush was in office, you have the remainder of the year to make some adjustments. You probably already know that you can sock away as much as $23,000, which includes $5,500 in catch-up contributions for people 50-plus, in your 401(k) plan. However, if you’re using …

More Investors Choosing Target-Date Funds for Retirement Savings

Target-date funds are growing in popularity among investors in workplace retirement plans because they’re so easy to manage. You pick a retirement date, and the mix of investments automatically adjusts to a more conservative allocation as you move closer to that date. No muss, no fuss. If you’re not investing in a TDF, chances are you will be. A new study says that by 2018, nearly two-thirds of all 401(k) savings contributions will go into these funds. TDFs have become …

Want Returns of 50% or More? Don’t We All.

Even in this rock-bottom interest-rate climate, three of four Americans over the age of 65 rely on investments to help maintain their fixed income. So the appeal by hucksters who promise higher-than-average returns (think Bernie Madoff) may even be more enticing. Financial fraudsters know this. They also know that older adults have a lifetime of earnings to pluck from. That’s why they’re more likely to target adults 65 and older than younger people, using direct mail solicitations and the old-fashioned …