Healing Principles of the Black Church Really Work

As the eyes of America watched the removal of the Confederate flag from the grounds of the South Carolina Capitol July 10, I feel thankful for the Black church and the principled role that it played in bringing a community together at a time that could have led to even greater strife and turmoil. Signing the bill to take down the flag, Gov. Nikki Haley eloquently said their actions “forever showed the state of South Carolina what love and forgiveness looks …

On Father’s Day, Let’s Show Black Men They Matter

The more I witness the vast gap between how some folks live in this country, the more I am grateful that I grew up in North Philadelphia with a strong father, mother and family. I am grateful for the close-knit group of neighbors, and the values and strength of folks — like my parents — who stared down hard times. And yes, on Father’s Day, I am especially thankful for my dad, the late Eugene Albert Kane Sr., a construction worker …

Maya Angelou: Memoirist, Poet and Much More

In 1969, at the age of 41, Maya Angelou, who died on May 28 at age 86 in Winston-Salem, N.C., published I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings. It was a memoir of her childhood and adolescent odyssey from Arkansas to California, during which she survived a cascade of traumatic events, including being raped by her mother’s boyfriend at age seven and overcoming prejudice to become, at age 16, San Francisco’s first black streetcar conductor. It was the first autobiography by an …

Richard Nixon’s Last Epithet

As the Senate Watergate Committee was turning up the heat on President Richard M. Nixon and his closest associates in 1973, chairman Sam Ervin, a North Carolina Democrat, became something of a national folk hero. At his death in 1985, one newspaper remembered him as “a latter-day Diogenes bent on finding the truth in an era of Watergate lies.” But to Nixon, the courtly, 76-year-old Ervin was something else altogether. “The president of the United States can’t be kicked around …

Reflecting on MLK Day: Learn to Love Those All Around You, Without Prejudice

“Now, I say to you today my friend, even though we face the difficulties of today and tomorrow, I still have a dream. It is a dream deeply rooted in the American dream. I have a dream that one day this Nation will rise up and live out the true meaning of its creed: We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal.” This quote, I’m sure, is familiar to all of you. If not, then …