This Week in Boomer History: Test Tube Baby … Kitchen Debate … ADA

Noteworthy events from our common experience President George H.W. Bush signs the Americans with Disabilities Act into law on July 26, 1990. Bob Dylan straps on his electric guitar and plugs in his amplifier at the Newport (R.I.) Folk Festival on July 25, 1965. The crowd boos (and cheers) him; purists are furious. >> Sign up for the AARP Health Newsletter  Born July 25, 1978, Louise Joy Brown is the world’s first “test tube baby,” though she’d more accurately be …

This Week in Boomer History: Jackson State … ‘Seinfeld’ Finale … Wallace Shot

Notable events from our shared experience President Richard Nixon nominates Anna Mae Hays (left) and Elizabeth P. Hoisington (right, with Mamie Eisenhower) the first female U.S. Army generals on May 15, 1970. On May 17, 2004, the first legal same-sex marriage in the United States takes place when Tanya McCloskey, 52, and Marcia Kadish, 56, say “I do” at City Hall in Cambridge, Mass. By day’s end, scores of other same-sex couples tie the knot. >> Sign up for the AARP Leisure …

Love the TV series “House of Cards”? You’ll adore the novel

  Starting on Valentine’s Day, Netflix airs its second season of House of Cards. Which means a lot of folks will be snuggling up with Kevin Spacey as a ruthless Congressman named Francis Underhill. Spacey isn’t playing the first political villain named Francis, however. Instead he’s playing the American incarnation of a character who first appeared 25 years ago in an English novel. This week, Sourcebooks is re-releasing House of Cards as an e-book. (The print edition arrives March 11.) …

‘Our Nixon’: History in Home Movies

Next year marks the 40th anniversary of the culmination of the Watergate scandal, which ended in the summer of 1974 when Richard Nixon defiantly boarded a helicopter on the White House lawn and left his presidency - and the American public’s trust in their government – smoldering on the ground below. Nixon died in 1994 – he would have turned 100 this year – but his legacy remains a living, breathing entity. The latest entry in Nixonography is the documentary Our …

Being ‘Nixonian’ Ain’t What It Used to Be

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) is plenty upset. The leak of a surreptitious recording of one of his reelection campaign’s strategy sessions captures McConnell and his aides discussing possible attacks on actress Ashley Judd – at the time a potential Democratic opponent – over her past struggles with depression and religious views. Although Mother Jones magazine’s David Corn, who obtained the scoop, hasn’t revealed the source, McConnell accused Democrats of bugging his campaign headquarters. “A quite Nixonian move,” is …

George McGovern: 5 Things You May Not Know About Him

Sen. George S. McGovern is remembered mostly as an opponent of the Vietnam War and as the ill-fated Democratic presidential nominee in 1972. After a campaign marred by mishaps - from an out-of-control national party convention schedule to revelations that his vice presidential pick, Thomas Eagleton, had been treated for clinical depression – McGovern suffered one of the worst landslide losses in history to incumbent Richard Nixon. But that one spectacular failure belies a lifetime of achievements. McGovern, who passed away …