10 Dumbest Things to Do Online

Trying to get scammed? Engage in these stupid but common online practices and the smart money is that you likely will. 1. Falling for emotional bait. Online and otherwise, scammers line their pockets on your emotions — greed, fear, curiosity — and often fuel each with “Act Now!” urgency. Offers of easy money and threats of negative consequences phish for your money and/or personal information. Promises of forbidden photos or links, especially with terse “Check this out!” messages, are used to install …

Dangerous Search Terms Beyond ‘Jimmy Kimmel’

Jimmy Kimmel got laughs last week after being named 2014’s Most Dangerous Cyber Celebrity. According to online security firm McAfee, one in five searches of Kimmel’s name landed Internet surfers on pages that “tested positive” for online malware threats. What’s no joke: Once again, cybercrooks have proved that people’s appetite for entertainment feeds their chances at hacking success. Why? “Celebrity names, coupled with the terms ‘video’ and ‘picture,’ are some of the most-searched terms on the Internet,” explains McAfee chief privacy officer Michelle …

How to Avoid Robocall Scams

At least one of every five phone calls now made is a robocall, and many are the work of scammers. You may hate these automated annoyances, but scammers love them: They’re cheap, far-reaching and hard to trace. No surprise that the Federal Trade Commission receives some 200,000 complaints about these calls each month. Here’s what you need to know: 1. If they’re selling, assume they’re scamming. Fraudsters may tout “free” in their recorded messages, but ask yourself this: Since when …

Another AARP Spoofing Scam Surfaces

Robocalls continue to falsely claim that AARP is providing “free” medical alert devices (I got one just yesterday, with a displayed caller ID number belonging to a local swim club), and now there’s a new ruse faking the AARP name. This time, live representatives claim to be calling on behalf of “AARP Member Advantages,” asking you to “verify” personal information based on the lie that it’s a requirement of the U.S. government if you want to continue participating in AARP-related services …

Beware of Fake Funeral Notices

With the latest malware campaign aimed at hijacking sensitive computer files and online accounts, scammers have sunk to a new low - specifically, six feet under. Cybercrooks are emailing fake funeral notifications. Stealing the names and logos of legitimate funeral homes, they appear to be an e-invite to a funeral or remembrance service for an unnamed friend or acquaintance. The gotcha is a link, alleged to provide details about the “upcoming celebration of your friend’s life service.” Click it and “instead …