Technology’s Brave New World: Crossing the Digital Divide

Charlotte Whittaker – AARP Kentucky Volunteer It’s a Brave New World and I want to be a part of it – online. Growing up in rural west Kentucky, I never imagined having the world at my fingertips. But, my tablet and my smartphone both fit in my purse and they are my ticket to the Web and everything I want to know. I was thrilled when invited to join AARP Live on RFD-TV and talk about how I’m using technology …

Stand Guard Against Veterans Scams

As we honor our former military personnel, Veterans Day is also a good time to recognize the year-round attempts to defraud them and to take advantage of those who appreciate their sacrifice and service. In some scams, veterans are specifically targeted. In others, fraudsters impersonate active-duty or former soldiers or claim to be working on their behalf to con patriotic civilians. A rundown of common schemes: Charity scams: Bogus charities that claim to benefit veterans are also among the most successful schemes, …

Staying a Step Ahead of the Bad Guys

By Doug Shadel, AARP Washington state director An identity thief with just a few bits of information about you can max out your credit cards, raid your bank account, even mortgage your house. In this digital age, a criminal can literally become you financially and take over your life. Alice Lipsky (not her real name) did this all the time. Using both high-tech computer skills and low-tech methods like car prowls and stealing purses, she took on the identities of …

Fall Fallout: It’s Time for Front-Door Fraud

Home may be where your heart is, but for scammers, it’s where the money is. They come knocking every autumn with these top perennial ploys: 1. Magazine sales. Consistently ranking among the top scams victimizing those over 60 (but targeting whoever answers the door), it goes like this: Fresh-faced teens sell overpriced magazine subscriptions for a fundraiser. Some fraudulently pose as students, others unknowingly work for scammer-run fronts trying to make a quick buck and/or collect credit card data for …

Elder Financial Fraud Just Keeps Getting Worse

A new survey is bringing renewed attention to the hideous crime of elder financial fraud — and the results show just how underreported it is. In a survey of 2,000 people, only 5 percent of people age 65 and up admitted to being swindled. Yet 19 percent of younger respondents (ages 40 to 64) said they knew of a family member or friend who’d been a victim of elder financial fraud, according to the survey by the Minneapolis-based life insurance …

FTC Asks Older Americans to Help Spot Fraud

The Federal Trade Commission has created a new campaign to tap into the experiences of older adults to help others avoid being victims of fraud. “A lot of times in the media, [older] people are depicted as things happening to them; they are victims. We don’t actually agree,” says Jennifer Leach, a consumer education specialist at the FTC. >> Scams to Avoid “Most people age 60, 65 and older are doing great,” she says. “They are experienced people who have great …