seniors

Medicaid’s Costly ‘Revolving Door’

Posted on 05/30/2013 by |Washington Watch | Comments

Bulletin TodayWhen Medicaid becomes a revolving door, it ends up both harming patients and increasing costs, a study by two George Washington University researchers finds. “Even short gaps in coverage can lead to delay or avoidance of needed care,” says Leighton Ku, the director of the Center for Health Policy Research at George Washington University’s School of Public Health and Health Services. “This can result in significant increases in hospitalizations for chronic diseases like diabetes, asthma and mental disorders. These costly …

Foreign Lottery Scams Target Older Americans

Posted on 04/15/2013 by |AARP Blog Author | Comments

Money & SavingsThe following is a guest post by Beau Ballinger, sr. program specialist for AARP ElderWatch in Colorado Recently I learned the story of an Idaho man who was visiting his 81-year-old widowed mother when he noticed large amounts of cash being withdrawn from her bank account, totaling $26,000. His mother admitted that she had been sending money to Jamaica. She’d been told she had won a $2 million lottery, and all she had to do to collect the prize was …

Kids in Assisted Living: Everyone Wins

Posted on 04/3/2013 by |Caregiving | Comments

CaregivingThere’s a children’s book series that has come out in the last year about a young girl named Carlyn and her visits to her grandmother in assisted living. It debunks the stereotypes about old people and long-term care. Here’s one line from Carlyn Meets Granny Girl’s New Friends: “Wow, this does not look like a place creepy people live, and I do not smell anything weird, either!” Carlyn said. There’s an even more interesting story behind the book. It’s written by …

Molecular Time Machine: Turning Back Brain Age

Posted on 03/22/2013 by |Fat to Fit | Comments

Personal Health Warning: This article should not be read by anyone with a brain that is under the age of 50. You don’t need to be around adolescents very long before you realize that their brains work differently from those of adults, especially senior adults. What the youthful brain lacks in judgment and stability, however, is compensated for by its speed of learning and memory recall. But what if, through a simple flip of a molecular switch, we seniors could have it …

A Winter’s Tale: Helping Seniors Weather the Cold

Posted on 01/23/2013 by |Volunteering | Comments

Your LifeThere’s a woman who sits in the square outside my office. Her name is Anna, and she’s 92. Her caregiver Magda wheels her there, just a couple blocks from her apartment, so she can feed the birds. Or, as Anna, a lifelong New Yorker, says, “the boyds.” Seeing Anna in the square is like seeing my friend Arthur at the theater. It’s her happy place. She could spend hours there, watching the boyds fly up to the rooftops and down …

Connecting Through Conversations

Posted on 01/17/2013 by |Volunteering | Comments

VolunteeringBad drivers. Never listen. Take forever in the bathroom. Always look for a handout. Constantly complain. Based upon the list above, which age bracket do they best describe? This list of stereotypes was used to break the ice with a group of eight seniors (age seventy or older) and eight high school students (age eighteen or younger), where they were asked to raise their hands if they thought the statement referred to the other generation. After every item was read, …